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News stories tagged with "franklin-county"

Laura Davenport and Cassie
Laura Davenport and Cassie

Close to Homeless: Surviving Transiency

People who are homeless in rural regions like Northern New York redefine our picture of "homelessness". The National Coalition for the Homeless, a not-for-profit advocacy group, says rural homeless are more likely to be white, female, married, working--and homeless for short periods of time. And instead of relying on social service agencies, many rural homeless people stay with family or friends until they get back on their feet. They move from place to place, staying with friends and relatives, or in a series of substandard apartments and trailers. NCPR talked with some of these overlooked neighbors, and with some of their advocates, in a series of stories last May called Close to Homeless. This week, we'll revisit those stories, and check back to see how the people we met are faring. In part one of our series last spring, David Sommerstein reported on a family in Dickinson Center in Franklin County who have experienced the most persistent kind of rural homelessness: chronic transiency.  Go to full article
Laura and her family
Laura and her family

Close to Homeless Update: Laura Davenport

It's been a momentous nine months for Laura Davenport and her family. Laura regained full custody of her children. The family's social worker said home life seemed stable enough to end regular visits. Laura got a full-time job. And she built an addition to her trailer. David Sommerstein stopped by recently to check back in.  Go to full article

Pataki, Mohawks Sign Land Claim Deal

Governor Pataki and the Akwesasne Mohawks yesterday formally signed an agreement to settle the 23 year-old Mohawk land claim in St. Lawrence and Franklin Counties. David Sommerstein has details.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Inlay Artist Dave Nichols

Tune into the Nashville Network, the country music version of MTV, and check out some of the guitars played by the superstars. If there's a close-up, look at the inlay work on the fingerboard or on the pick guard. All of the customized work you see was done in a shop in Whippleville, a few miles south of Malone. Besides the custom work for Martin and Gibson Guitar companies Dave Nichols builds guitars and mandolins and happily teaches others to do so. Lamar Bliss has the story for Meet the Masters.  Go to full article

Mohawks Proceed on Land Claim Deal

The St. Regis Mohawk Tribe was awaiting word last night on a request to stay the 22-year old Mohawk land claim court case. The request comes after the traditional government in Akwesasne failed to approve a proposed settlement of the lawsuit, but it did throw its support behind two other tribal councils to pursue the deal. David Sommerstein explains.  Go to full article

Distrust Lingers Over Mohawk Vote on Land Claims Settlement

Deliberations continue in the Mohawk community over a proposed land claim deal with New York State worth tens of millions of dollars. After 22 years of negotiations and lawsuits, two tribal governments have approved the deal. But the traditional Council of Chiefs says it will take at least another two weeks to discuss the proposal. As Brian Mann reports, even Mohawks who support the settlement say deep distrust remains.  Go to full article
Larger land claim map at the link below
Larger land claim map at the link below

County Governments Oppose Mohawk Land Deal

Legislators in Frankln County voted unanimously Thursday to oppose a land claims settlement between the state and the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe. County officials say a ten million dollars payment meant to offset the loss of taxes isn't big enough. As Chris Knight reports, the arguements made by legislators mirror those heard earlier this month when St. Lawrence County Legislators voted to oppose the settlement.  Go to full article

Locals Speak Out Against Land Claim Deal

The St. Lawrence County legislature is expected to oppose a proposed settlement of the 22-year old Mohawk land claim. Legislators complain they weren't consulted before the deal was made public. At a finance committee meeting last night, lawmakers put off taking formal action against the deal. According to the Watertown Daily Times, the full Board will consider a resolution and a list of concerns about the settlement on Monday.
The agreement between three Mohawk councils and Governor Pataki still must be approved by tribal members by referendum on November 27th. The leaders of towns in St. Lawrence and Franklin counties that would be affected by the settlement are also speaking out. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Mohawks, State Reach Tentative Land Claims Deal

The three tribal councils that govern the Akwesasne Mohawk reservation near Massena yesterday announced a proposed settlement with New York State to end the 22 year-old Mohawk land claim. The councils represent the American, Canadian, and traditional constituencies in Akwesasne.
Under the deal, the state and federal governments would pay the Mohawks $100 million to compensate for land in St. Lawrence and Franklin Counties taken illegally in the early 1800s. The tribe would get Long Sault and Croil Islands on the St. Lawrence River, a 215 acre parcel on Massena Point, and the right to buy more than 13,000 acres of land within the claim area from willing sellers. The Mohawks would also get low-cost power, free SUNY tuition, and aboriginal hunting and fishing rights. Non-native towns would share a $10 million fund to compensate for lost tax revenues.
The agreement will now go before the Mohawk community for a referendum on November 27th. In a prepared statement, a spokesman for Governor Pataki said he was "encouraged by the good faith efforts being made by all sides to resolve this long-standing, historic dispute."
The proposed settlement is different from a deal reached last year by a previous tribal council in several key ways. David Sommerstein spoke yesterday with Chief Jim Ransom of the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe.  Go to full article
Administering antibiotics.<br />Source:  AMC
Administering antibiotics.
Source: AMC

In Franklin County, Training for the Unthinkable

Public health agencies in Franklin County announced this week that they had completed a two-day mock bio-terror drill. The training session, which ran August 18 and 19, was designed to test coordination between a dozen different organizations ranging from the Red Cross to local hospitals to the public schools. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

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