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News stories tagged with "franklin-county"

Distrust Lingers Over Mohawk Vote on Land Claims Settlement

Deliberations continue in the Mohawk community over a proposed land claim deal with New York State worth tens of millions of dollars. After 22 years of negotiations and lawsuits, two tribal governments have approved the deal. But the traditional Council of Chiefs says it will take at least another two weeks to discuss the proposal. As Brian Mann reports, even Mohawks who support the settlement say deep distrust remains.  Go to full article
Larger land claim map at the link below
Larger land claim map at the link below

County Governments Oppose Mohawk Land Deal

Legislators in Frankln County voted unanimously Thursday to oppose a land claims settlement between the state and the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe. County officials say a ten million dollars payment meant to offset the loss of taxes isn't big enough. As Chris Knight reports, the arguements made by legislators mirror those heard earlier this month when St. Lawrence County Legislators voted to oppose the settlement.  Go to full article

Locals Speak Out Against Land Claim Deal

The St. Lawrence County legislature is expected to oppose a proposed settlement of the 22-year old Mohawk land claim. Legislators complain they weren't consulted before the deal was made public. At a finance committee meeting last night, lawmakers put off taking formal action against the deal. According to the Watertown Daily Times, the full Board will consider a resolution and a list of concerns about the settlement on Monday.
The agreement between three Mohawk councils and Governor Pataki still must be approved by tribal members by referendum on November 27th. The leaders of towns in St. Lawrence and Franklin counties that would be affected by the settlement are also speaking out. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Mohawks, State Reach Tentative Land Claims Deal

The three tribal councils that govern the Akwesasne Mohawk reservation near Massena yesterday announced a proposed settlement with New York State to end the 22 year-old Mohawk land claim. The councils represent the American, Canadian, and traditional constituencies in Akwesasne.
Under the deal, the state and federal governments would pay the Mohawks $100 million to compensate for land in St. Lawrence and Franklin Counties taken illegally in the early 1800s. The tribe would get Long Sault and Croil Islands on the St. Lawrence River, a 215 acre parcel on Massena Point, and the right to buy more than 13,000 acres of land within the claim area from willing sellers. The Mohawks would also get low-cost power, free SUNY tuition, and aboriginal hunting and fishing rights. Non-native towns would share a $10 million fund to compensate for lost tax revenues.
The agreement will now go before the Mohawk community for a referendum on November 27th. In a prepared statement, a spokesman for Governor Pataki said he was "encouraged by the good faith efforts being made by all sides to resolve this long-standing, historic dispute."
The proposed settlement is different from a deal reached last year by a previous tribal council in several key ways. David Sommerstein spoke yesterday with Chief Jim Ransom of the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe.  Go to full article
Administering antibiotics.<br />Source:  AMC
Administering antibiotics.
Source: AMC

In Franklin County, Training for the Unthinkable

Public health agencies in Franklin County announced this week that they had completed a two-day mock bio-terror drill. The training session, which ran August 18 and 19, was designed to test coordination between a dozen different organizations ranging from the Red Cross to local hospitals to the public schools. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Lawmakers Ratify Casino Compact, 11 Years Later

In last minute action yesterday, the Assembly ratified the St. Regis Mohawks' compact for its casino in Akwesasne near Massena. The compact was drawn up in 1993 between then-Governor Mario Cuomo and tribal officials, but it was nullified by a court of appeals ruling last year that said the full legislature needed to approve it. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Welfare to Work: Backfiring?

A new study of two North Country counties says a key component of welfare reform of the mid-1990s, welfare to work, is encouraging low wage work and the persistence of high poverty levels in the region. Martha Foley talks with the study's author, SUNY Potsdam professor George Gonos.  Go to full article
Lynee Erlenbach and her sisters show off latch-hook rugs they made.
Lynee Erlenbach and her sisters show off latch-hook rugs they made.

Homelessness: Surviving the School Shuffle

In the North Country, homelessness often means something different than sleeping on a park bench or under a bridge. A family who can't afford a home may move in with relatives, then a month later into a motel room, then into a low-rent apartment, and on and on. Each time the family moves, the children have to get used to new surroundings, new people, and new routines. And in many cases, they have to go to a new school. Preliminary studies show up to a third of the students in many districts don't end the academic year in the same school they started. On the second day of our series, Close to Homeless, we look at how transiency affects kids' education and the schools they attend. David Sommerstein has our story.  Go to full article

With Rising Homelessness, Affordable Housing Scarce

As we've been hearing this week, homelessness in northern New York can mean many things. People stay as long as they can with relatives or several families might share a small trailer. But social workers and care providers say more and more people are literally winding up on the streets. In Franklin County, a consortium of aid groups is working to measure the number of truly homeless people. They're also working with landlords to help provide low-cost apartments. Nancy Reich is head of Comlinks, a regional housing authority based in Malone. She says even with subsidies, affordable apartments are harder than ever to find. Reich spoke with Brian Mann.  Go to full article
Laura Davenport and Cassie
Laura Davenport and Cassie

Homelessness: Breaking the Cycle of Transiency

In part one of our series 'Close to Homeless', David Sommerstein reports on a family in Dickinson Center in Franklin County who have experienced the most persistent kind of rural homelessness: chronic transiency.  Go to full article

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