Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "free-trade"

Representatives want shared border talks revived

Representatives of northern New York's border regions have new hope for sharing border crossing facitlies and procedures with Canada. Martha Foley reports.  Go to full article

Environmental Effects of Free Trade

When NAFTA was passed in 1994, environmentalists feared catastrophic results. Polluting industries would move to Mexico, where environmental protections hadn't caught up with those in the U.S. and Canada. They were worried that air pollution would increase as more goods were shipped across international borders. And they were concerned that shared resources like the Great Lakes water system might lose their protected status and become commodities subject to trade. Supporters of NAFTA argued that increased prosperity would lead to improved pollution technology and a strengthening of environmental protections. But eight years later, the effects of NAFTA on the environment appear to be mixed. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Karen Schaefer explains why.  Go to full article

Filmmaker Stephanie Black: Life and Debt

David Sommerstein talks with award-winning documentary director Stephanie Black. She'll be in Potsdam tonight to show and talk about her latest film, Life and Debt. It highlights how the policies of global lending organizations like the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund affect everyday people in Jamaica. The film features a reggae soundtrack.

Life and Debt will be shown at the Roxy Theater in Potsdam at 7:15, with an introduction and discussion afterwards with Stephanie Black. One of the artists featured on the soundtrack, Yami Bolo, will be playing live at Maxfields in Potsdam Monday at 10 pm.  Go to full article

Anti-Globalization Movement Changes After September 11

Since September 11, expressing dissent toward the policies of the U.S. government and its allies has been a tricky business. Some people have called criticism of government policies anti-patriotic.

Last weekend's demonstrations in Ottawa against the meetings of the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the G20 finance ministers were the first anti-globalization protests since the terror attacks. Earlier this year, protests against free trade meetings in Quebec City turned violent, as thousands of police faced thousands of protesters.

David Sommerstein was on the streets of Ottawa to ask demonstrators how the anti-globalization movement has changed since September 11. He sends this report.  Go to full article

High Court Rules Against Tax-free Imports by Mohawks

Canada's highest court ruled last week Akwesasne Mohawks on the border with New York do not have an aboriginal right to bring goods into Canada without paying taxes. Critics see the ruling as a setback for native rights in Canada. David Sommerstein reports the Mohawks aren't finished fighting for duty-free trade.  Go to full article

FTAA Protesters March Over the International Bridge in Massena

Hundreds of protesters marched peacefully across the international bridge in Massena yesterday afternoon in a show of solidarity against the FTAA or Free Trade Area of the Americas. They're on their way to the summit in Quebec City this weekend.  Go to full article

Brian Mann Speaks with "Street Medics" Protesting Free Trade

In the years since the first free trade protests exploded in Seattle, the movement has grown dramatically. It's also more organized. They have trained legal advisors and media liaisons on the scene. They also have their medical crews. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann met with a team of "street medics" on their way to the Summit of the Americas in Quebec City.  Go to full article

Activists Prepare for FTAA Protests

Political and social activists from across North America are preparing for the unknown as they ready for protests this week at the Summit of the Americas in Quebec City. Groups from St. Lawrence County hope to practice non-violent protest against the FTAA, or Free Trade Area of the Americas, but they're not sure if they'll even make it into Canada. So as a symbolic gesture, many groups plan to stage a demonstration at the Cornwall border crossing near Massena. Jodi Tosti reports.  Go to full article

Free Trade in the Americas: Critics and Supporters, Pt. 2

When leaders of the Americas head to Quebec City next weekend to continue negotiations on the Free Trade Area of the Americas, there'll be a lot more on the table than free trade. The FTAA, as it's called, also establishes the economic, legal, and intellectual rights of companies when they deal with foreign governments. FTAA critics say the rights of people take a back seat to the rights of corporations in free trade deals. In the second installment on protests in Quebec City, David Sommerstein tests the anti-corporate arguments.  Go to full article

Mohawk Tribal Council Seeks to Insure Non-violent Crossing

The St. Regis Mohawk Tribal Council is hoping to insure a non-violent crossing as activists head into Canada at the Cornwall next Thursday. Mohawks from both sides of the border have promised to escort people headed to the FTAA talks across the international bridge from Cornwall Island. But the tribal council hopes the action will stop at a symbolic show of solidarity. Yesterday, council announced it's taking a zero-tolerance stand against rumored blockades or other confrontations. Jody Tosti reports.  Go to full article

1-10 of 13  next 3 »  last »