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News stories tagged with "fungus"

Beaver meadows are slow to reforest because they lack a soil fungus needed by black spruce. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/38983646@N06/3975369109">Putneypics</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Beaver meadows are slow to reforest because they lack a soil fungus needed by black spruce. Photo: Putneypics, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Fungus and forest

Tall trees may be the kings of the forest, but there is another kingdom of forest life that passes unnoticed. Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley talk about the arboreal network of fungus.  Go to full article
Cacao leaves have better disease resistance with the help of endophyte fungi. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/phuonglovejesus2782010/">Phong Tran</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Cacao leaves have better disease resistance with the help of endophyte fungi. Photo: Phong Tran, CC some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Fungal Lurkers

Martha Foley and Dr Curt Stager discuss fungal lurkers--fungi that live inside plants. Fungal lurkers are a new discovery and scientists believe that this type of fungus helps the plant it lives on but may harm animals and people.  Go to full article
Researchers crawl under the ledge of rock, wading upstream
Researchers crawl under the ledge of rock, wading upstream

Hale's Cave near Albany is ground zero of a deadly bat disease

The deadly bat disease known as white-nose syndrome was first identified in upstate New York three years ago. It continues to spread fast, with outbreaks now confirmed as far away as Ontario and Maryland. Researchers still don't know how to stop the fungus from reaching new caves. Here in the North Country, biologists now say the disease has already wiped out 95% of the largest bat colonies. Brian Mann traveled recently with a team of biologists returning to the cave near Albany where the first bats infected with white nose were discovered. He sent this audio postcard.  Go to full article
An infected bat at the Greeley Mine in Vermont (Photo: USFWS)
An infected bat at the Greeley Mine in Vermont (Photo: USFWS)

As bats return to winter caves, white-nose disease expected to spread fast

Last week, the US Fish & Wildlife Service issued preliminary guidelines urging roughly two-dozen states to prepare for the arrival of "white nose syndrome." That's the deadly fungal disease that has wiped out bat colonies across northern New York and Vermont. White nose was first discovered in a cave near Albany. Some of the hardest hit sites are in the Adirondacks and the Green Mountains, where researchers estimate that hundreds of thousands of animals have died. Brian Mann spoke yesterday with Jeremy Coleman, with the Fish and Wildlife Service. Coleman is the national coordinator for the hundreds of scientists working to develop a response to white nose syndrome.  Go to full article
Carl Herzog checks his equipment before a night on the road (Source:  C. Herzog, NYSDEC)
Carl Herzog checks his equipment before a night on the road (Source: C. Herzog, NYSDEC)

Bat songs in the Adirondacks silenced by white nose syndrome

This summer, researchers across the Northeast are working to measure the impact of white nose syndrome, a deadly disease that has wiped out bat population in the region. Scientists say whole colonies have been obliterated. Brian Mann rode along on a survey in the Adirondacks and has our story.  Go to full article

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