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News stories tagged with "gallagher"

A musical respite from summer's stormy weather

The Keene Valley Congregational Church hosts an evening of music, stories and poetry Saturday night (7:30pm), and an opportunity to help those still rebuilding from the summer floods.

Adirondack harpist Martha Gallagher will host the benefit concert. Her home was one of the many heavily damaged by the flooding from tropical storm Irene.

Saturday night's concert, arranged by the East Branch Friends of the Arts, will also mark the release of a new CD that Gallagher recorded recently to benefit flood victims. All the proceeds from the concert and CD will go to the Keene and Jay Flood Recovery Funds. Todd Moe has a preview.  Go to full article

New music: "Ebb and Flow"

Adirondack harper Martha Gallagher joined Todd Moe in the studio this morning to talk about the new music from her latest cd, Ebb and Flow. This new eclectic collection includes genres of music that range from Blues to Latin, from Jazz to Contemporary Folk. Martha says sense of place is the building block of each song. Joining her on much of the music are talented musicians from across our region.

You're invited to join Martha for the Scandinavian Christmas tale, A Christmas Rose, tonight (7 pm) at the St. Lawrence County Arts Council in Potsdam.  Go to full article
Bill and Tommy Gallagher (Photo: Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enteprprise)
Bill and Tommy Gallagher (Photo: Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enteprprise)

The Hospice Path: Fighting "compassion fatigue"

The last few months, we've been airing a special new series called the Hospice Path.

We've been profiling one family, the Gallaghers in Saranac Lake, who are working with the hospice program as Bill Gallagher nears the end of his life.
Bill suffers from a degenerative lung condition and doctors say he has less than a year to live.

This morning, Brian Mann looks at the other side of the relationship, talking with the hospice workers who help people across the North Country at the end of their lives.  Go to full article
Bill & Tomi Gallagher (Photo:  Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)
Bill & Tomi Gallagher (Photo: Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

Hospice Path: Dealing with depression

This morning we continue our on-going series called the Hospice Path. North Country Public Radio is looking in-depth at the way hospice and palliative care programs can help people at the end of their lives.

We've been profiling Bill Gallagher in Saranac Lake. He's 87 years old and his lungs are slowly failing. With the support of his wife Tomi, he's been able to remain at home with his family. Despite those successes, Bill has struggled at times with depression, loneliness and boredom.

As Brian Mann reports, hospice experts say those experiences are common for hospice patients nearing the end of their lives.  Go to full article
Zelda Foster (Source:  Columbia University)
Zelda Foster (Source: Columbia University)

The Hospice Path, Part Three: Remembering pioneer Zelda Foster

North Country Public Radio has begun an on-going series looking at the ways that hospice programs can help when someone is approaching the end of their life.

It turns out a social worker here in New York was one of the pioneers of hospice and end-of-life care. Zelda Foster passed away in 2006.

At that time, reporter Gregory Warner profiled a woman who spent forty years advocating for people's right to die with dignity.  Go to full article
Bill Gallagher as a young soldier in the 10th Mountain Division (Photo provided)
Bill Gallagher as a young soldier in the 10th Mountain Division (Photo provided)

The Hospice Path, Part Two: Nearing the end, celebrating a life lived in full

Last week, we began a new on-going series called the Hospice Path.

North Country Public Radio is looking in-depth at the way hospice programs across the region are changing people's lives at a time when they're forced to confront the certainty of death.

We're telling that story in part by spending time with the Gallagher family in Saranac Lake.

Bill Gallagher is 87 years old and his lungs are slowly failing.

But with the help of High Peaks Hospice, he's been able to stay at home with his wife Tomi.

In order to better describe their experience, our reporter Brian Mann decided to first spend some time asking about Bill's long life before he got sick.  Go to full article
Bill and Tomi Gallagher (Photos:  Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)
Bill and Tomi Gallagher (Photos: Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

The Hospice Path, Part One: "You are not alone"

Since the 1960s, the hospice movement has been working to give Americans more options and more choices when they reach the end of their lives.

The idea is that even after we know we're dying, we can make decisions that shape the quality of our remaining time.

High Peaks Hospice and Palliative Care serves patients across a huge swath of the North Country, from Warren County all the way to St. Lawrence County.

Brian Mann has been working with the organization to profile one family that has entered the program, the Gallaghers in Saranac Lake.

In the weeks ahead, Brian's series will follow the Gallagher family, telling the story of their lives and their work with hospice.  Go to full article

Preview: Not Out of the Woods 3

Adirondack harper Martha Gallagher hosts the third annual "Not out of the Woods Yet" event at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts on January 23rd. It's an evening of music and stories celebrating life in the Adirondacks. Martha will be joined by musician friends from around the region, and some suprises. She told Todd Moe that the idea for "Not Out of the Woods Yet" came to her a few years ago when reached an important milestone in her life - turning 50.  Go to full article
High art -- Donald Gallagher near the ceiling of the Meeting House Museum in East DeKalb
High art -- Donald Gallagher near the ceiling of the Meeting House Museum in East DeKalb

Hand painted history: restoring a 19th century interior

Earlier this month, a "Photo of the Day" on our website showed an artist painting the interior of the Old Methodist Meeting House in the St. Lawrence County town of DeKalb. It's part of ongoing restoration work on the building that's now the town museum. Todd Moe stopped by to talk with the artist about milk paint, trompe l'oeil and painting lots of lines.  Go to full article

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