Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "gardening"

If you could actually see the little suckers, this is what a fungus gnat would look like. You're welcome. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Trauerfliege.JPG">Peter Ruhr</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
If you could actually see the little suckers, this is what a fungus gnat would look like. You're welcome. Photo: Peter Ruhr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Those annoying little bugs aren't fruitflies, they're fungus gnats. Here's how to get rid of them.

The little things flying randomly around your office? They're most likely fungus gnats, an annoying pest that lives in the soil of potted plants. They eat fungus in the soil, and overwatering gives them a lovely habitat to thrive in.

Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy says fungus gnats aren't much of the threat to the plant, and there are ways to control them.  Go to full article
Martha Foley's perennials. Photo: Martha Foley
Martha Foley's perennials. Photo: Martha Foley

How to build a perennial garden

The catalog pages picturing masses of colorful perennial flowers can be exciting. But creating your own flower beds can be a daunting prospect. Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy shares strategies for building a perennial garden.  Go to full article
"Day-Neutral" strawberries give a longer harvest season. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51035796924@N01/3654599083/">Wayne Surber</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
"Day-Neutral" strawberries give a longer harvest season. Photo: Wayne Surber, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Thinking ahead for strawberries

Strawberries are a good fruit crop for home gardeners to try, and now's the time to be thinking ahead and placing an order for young plants.

According to Cooperative Extension's Amy Ivy, there's one key choice to make first: June-bearing? or day-neutral?

She tells Martha Foley June-bearing strawberries come in a rush at the beginning of summer. Day-neutral plant bear for most of the summer and into fall, but require more attention.  Go to full article
Illustration from a 1904 Burpee seed catalog. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/burpee/167767777/">Burpee Gardens</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Illustration from a 1904 Burpee seed catalog. Photo: Burpee Gardens, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Tips for handling garden catalog-induced tempations

For most backyard gardeners it's still too early for serious seed shopping. But it doesn't hurt to look and plan. Just like weeds, those garden catalogs seem to multiply in the mail this time of year. They're fun to look at in mid-winter, but horticulturist Amy Ivy shares some advice on how to use those catalogs as tools for garden planning and landscaping ideas.  Go to full article
Home heating systems can make it hard to provide humidity for houseplants in winter. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/spaceamoeba/4171028387/">spaceamoeba</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Home heating systems can make it hard to provide humidity for houseplants in winter. Photo: spaceamoeba, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Keeping houseplants healthy in harsh winter conditions

With the bitter cold outside, the heat will be turned up inside the house. That means dryer air will be rising right towards the houseplants on the windowsill. It's tough times for those houseplants.

Martha Foley discusses options with Amy Ivy, horticulturist with Cornell Cooperative Extension Service of Clinton and Essex Counties.  Go to full article
Potatoes rising. Photo: Ellen Rocco
Potatoes rising. Photo: Ellen Rocco

Planning for potatoes

It isn't the growing season yet in the North Country, not by a long shot, but it is planning time. Catalogs for seeds, gardening supplies and gadgets are the first signs of spring in many households. The potential looks limitless...and overwhelming.

Amy Ivy, horticulturist with Cooperative Extension, shares a fun idea for a summer project that can work even for non-gardeners: potatoes.  Go to full article
Red wigglers raised on coffee grounds and other kitchen scraps. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/13359925@N02/3217409170/">Marc Tyler</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Red wigglers raised on coffee grounds and other kitchen scraps. Photo: Marc Tyler, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Welcome the red wrigglers for indoor composting

Worms? In your kitchen? Eeeew! But wait... Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy tells Martha Foley a little bin of red wigglers under your sink (or, in her case, your desk) makes a great project for kids, as well as a supply of compost for houseplants and garden.

True, it's a small-scale operation probably not suited to handling all your vegetable-y food waste, but still, she says it's fun, and NOT smelly.  Go to full article
Christmas Cactus in bloom. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/skynoir/4160484800">Sky Noir</a>, Creative Commons, some roghts reserved
Christmas Cactus in bloom. Photo: Sky Noir, Creative Commons, some roghts reserved

Keeping holiday greenery happy

Did you get a plant as a gift for the holidays? Horticulturist Amy Ivy has some winter indoor plant care tips for poinsettias, Christmas cactus, cyclamens, and ideas for recycling the Christmas tree.  Go to full article
Ice storm, December 2013. Photo by Mark Kurtz
Ice storm, December 2013. Photo by Mark Kurtz

What to do for ice-covered trees

Trees and shrubs are bent and broken under the weight of the icy mix of rain, sleet and snow that fell over the weekend. So the topic of today's yard and garden conversation is no surprise.

Cooperative Extension's Amy Ivy shares what to do, and what NOT to do for ice covered limbs and branches. First, she says, do no harm: be gentle. It's tempting to try to knock the ice off a tree or branch that's bent low with ice, but Amy says that can do more damage, possibly even break the branch altogether. Her advice is to prop up a limb if you want to try and help.

There's no hurry, she says. Don't risk life and limb to do any yard work, it's OK to wait till the ice is gone and the footing is better for working. Waiting won't make things worse for the tree or shrubs. When you DO decide to prune broken tree limbs, she says, make a clean cut, and it's best take the whole branch.

Finally, she says, she'll be waiting till spring to tackle shrubs that need pruning.  Go to full article
Two kinds of bird feeders, with shelter. Photo by Hank Hoffman, who lives in Ottawa. He says Phoenix the cat is is indoors-only and enjoys watching them both. And don't get him started on the squirrels.
Two kinds of bird feeders, with shelter. Photo by Hank Hoffman, who lives in Ottawa. He says Phoenix the cat is is indoors-only and enjoys watching them both. And don't get him started on the squirrels.

Feeding the birds, for them and for you

The days are short. It's really cold. And now the landscape is snow-covered, all across the North Country.

Ideal conditions for feeding the birds. And there are lots of choices to make, about what to feed and how. Cheap, giant bags of mixed seeds? Not great. Ditto, stal donuts.

Amy Ivy shares best practices with Martha Foley in their weekly conversation.  Go to full article

« first  « previous 10  11-30 of 616  next 10 »  last »