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News stories tagged with "gardening"

Two kinds of bird feeders, with shelter. Photo by Hank Hoffman, who lives in Ottawa. He says Phoenix the cat is is indoors-only and enjoys watching them both. And don't get him started on the squirrels.
Two kinds of bird feeders, with shelter. Photo by Hank Hoffman, who lives in Ottawa. He says Phoenix the cat is is indoors-only and enjoys watching them both. And don't get him started on the squirrels.

Feeding the birds, for them and for you

The days are short. It's really cold. And now the landscape is snow-covered, all across the North Country.

Ideal conditions for feeding the birds. And there are lots of choices to make, about what to feed and how. Cheap, giant bags of mixed seeds? Not great. Ditto, stal donuts.

Amy Ivy shares best practices with Martha Foley in their weekly conversation.  Go to full article
Christmas tree farm. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/39792195@N00/3114276220/">Melissa</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Christmas tree farm. Photo: Melissa, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Yes, you can enjoy a Christmas tree, guilt-free

Just in case you're feeling guilty about cutting a tree for Christmas, or buying a cut tree, or if you just feel bad when you see all those formerly live trees, Amy Ivy says, don't worry.

Amy is horticulturist with the Cooperative Extension Service. She tells Martha Foley Christmas trees are another valuable regional crop, and a good example of a renewable resource.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/dichohecho/4254593017/">Sarah</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Sarah, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Do trees and shrubs suffer from the cold and wind?

A winter storm watch is posted for this week, on top of a windy, cold few days. Storm windows and extra layers help us humans, but what about our trees and shrubs?

Do they get a sudden shock when a cold snap hits in November? Maybe. Amy Ivy talks with Martha Foley about the effects of cold and wind on trees and shrubs, and has tips on what to do to help them stand the bitter weather better.  Go to full article
Don't forget to water your fall plantings. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/horrigans/4714481169/">Sarah Horrigan</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Don't forget to water your fall plantings. Photo: Sarah Horrigan, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Odds and ends in the garden

Most of us backyard gardeners have probably turned our energy to annual jobs like putting up storm windows and bringing in firewood. But there are still odds and ends of chores that could fill the chinks in between those crucial pre-winter chores.

In their weekly conversation, Cooperative Extension's Amy Ivy and NCPR's Martha Foley run through a quick list. Most are not must-dos...except one: watering this past season's new plantings.  Go to full article
Roseanne Gallagher, with chickens. Photo: Sarah Harris.
Roseanne Gallagher, with chickens. Photo: Sarah Harris.

Certified naturally grown: an organic alternative

It can be expensive and time-consuming for farmers, especially small farmers, to go through the organic certification process. But there's another option. It's called certified naturally grown. The grassroots organization that offers this label uses organic standards, has farmers conduct inspections for their peers, and provides marketing materials.  Go to full article
Last chance for planting garlic bulbs. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/34167928@N05/3583522970/">artefatia</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Last chance for planting garlic bulbs. Photo: artefatia, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Last call for fall garden chores

With a mix of snow and rain in the forecast this week, horticulturist Amy Ivy says this is really the last week for getting bulbs - garlic, tulip - in the ground this season. Amy also spoke with Todd Moe about putting the lawn to bed for the winter.  Go to full article
Eastern bluebird feeding on winterberry. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/nebirdsplus/5355914860/">nebirdsplus</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Eastern bluebird feeding on winterberry. Photo: nebirdsplus, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Adding color to the bleak November garden

At a glance, the November landscape can look mighty bleak. The brilliant display of foliage is replaced by muted washes of brown and purple, still beautiful, but subtly so, with a few touches of yellow in the marshy spots.

The real brights spots left are probably the few fruits that remain, or are just coming into their own. They're nice on the eye, and a vital link in the food chain that supports migrating and winter-resident birds.

Amy Ivy has an eye on trees and plants to add to the backyard landscape in her conversation with Martha Foley this morning.  Go to full article
Healthy porcelain garlic, after a successful growing season..
Healthy porcelain garlic, after a successful growing season..

Last call for garlic!

Halloween is just about here, and besides pumpkins, the crop on Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy's mind is garlic. Not harvest, but planting. Mid to late October is prime time to get garlic in the ground for harvest next summer.

The basics are simple, but attention to detail, and next summer's weeds, is important, as she tells Martha Foley.  Go to full article
These leaves are lovely on the tree, and a valuable resource for gardeners once they're on the ground. Photo: Brian Mann
These leaves are lovely on the tree, and a valuable resource for gardeners once they're on the ground. Photo: Brian Mann

Leaf compost is garden gold

Trying to figure out how to cope with all those leaves? Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy says to add them to your compost pile. Next year you'll want to put all that nutrition back into your garden plot and plant beds.  Go to full article

"Subversive gardening" on World Food Day

Today is World Food Day, a day to think about hunger and food insecurity around the world and in our backyard.

High school students from around the North Country are meeting at SUNY Potsdam today for a Food Day Youth Summit.

Keynote speaker Roger Doiron, founder and director of Kitchen Gardeners International, led the successful effort to get a kitchen garden planted at the White House.  Go to full article

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