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News stories tagged with "ge"

GE offices in Schenectady, NY, where the company was founded. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/87587278@N00/3581295898/">Chuck Miller</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
GE offices in Schenectady, NY, where the company was founded. Photo: Chuck Miller, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

GE factory closure shocks the Town of Fort Edward

General Electric announced last week it plans to cease operations at their Fort Edward factory within a year. The factory currently makes electrical components and the move will eliminate 200 jobs from the small community in Washington County.

As the town braces for the impact, the Innovation Trial's Jenna Flanagan talks to some locals about what comes next, including the possibility of an extensive site cleanup.  Go to full article

Big companies fight back on river clean-ups

The Environmental Protection Agency was to be in Ft Edward last night for an information session on the dredging of PCB-laden sediment from the Hudson River. The $780 million project is expected to take six years. It's the biggest clean up of a river in the country. The first phase of the cleanup concluded in October.

PCBs are considered probable carcinogens. General Electric plants in Fort Edward and neighboring Hudson Falls dumped PCB-contaminated wastewater into the Hudson for decades before PCBs were banned in 1977. GE has been doing the clean up, supervised by the EPA. They'll review this past summer's work over the winter. The next dredging work is expected in 2011.

GE fought the plan to dredge PCBs for years. Spokesman Mark Behan told the Albany Times Union the company has not committed to continue to pay for the clean up when dredging resumes.

A fight over dioxin pollution from a Dow Chemical plant in central Michigan also dates back over 30 years. It's a local issue that's made national news, like the Hudson River PCBs. And it's still unresolved, despite administration changes, Congressional hearings, and whistle-blower awards. Shawn Allee met the man who first took the issue to Congress and who feels it should make news again.  Go to full article

PCB dredging begins today on upper Hudson River

After years of lawsuits and political wrangling, General Electric will begin removing toxic PCBs from the bottom of the Hudson River today. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Labor economist: Massena news matches regional, national trend

General Motors' decision follows a trend that has rapidly decimated the high-wage manufacturing jobs that once sustained North Country towns like Newton Falls and Malone. Alan Beideck is an analyst with the New York state Department of Labor, based in Saranac Lake. According to Beideck, manufacturing jobs will be hard to replace. Factory jobs in St. Lawrence County pay an average salary of around $51,000 a year. That compares with just $31,000 for most of the county's workers.  Go to full article
General Electric discloses PCB spending
General Electric discloses PCB spending

GE Reveals Spending on PCB Dredging Fight

A group of religious investors led by a Roman Catholic nun says General Electric spent more than $120 million trying to block the clean up of toxic PCBs. GE disclosed the figures after years of pressure from activist shareholders. As Brian Mann reports, critics say the money should have been spent cleaning up the Hudson River and other polluted sites.  Go to full article

Fort Edward: PCB Search Moves Downtown

The search for PCBs in the Hudson River valley will soon move to downtown Fort Edward. According to the Glens Falls Post-Star, state environmental officials plan to begin testing soil and groundwater later this month. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

GE Strike Looms In Fort Edward

General Electric's factories in Fort Edward and Schenectady are facing their first national strike in more than thirty years. GE's largest unions - representing some twenty thousand workers - say they'll stage a two-day protest next week. As Brian Mann reports, local businesses worry that a longer dispute could follow.  Go to full article

EPA, GE May Work Together On Hudson Clean-up

After years of bitter fighting, General Electric and the Environmental Protection Agency are moving ahead with plans to dredge the Hudson River. GE is giving signs that it may work with the EPA - instead of filing legal action to block the clean-up. Federal officials are also offering compromise. Brian Mann has this update.  Go to full article

Hudson River PCB Dredging Plan Receives EPA Go-Ahead

The Environmental Protection Agency is moving forward with a plan to dredge more than a million pounds of PCBs from the Hudson River. As Brian Mann reports, the official "record of decision" does not include controversial performance standards demanded by General Electric.  Go to full article

EPA Staff Meets with Environmental Groups on Hudson River PCB Cleanup

Environmental groups met Tuesday with top staff at the EPA to discuss a clean-up of the Hudson River. The talks follow earlier closed-door sessions between the agency and GE. As Brian Mann reports, clean up supporters worry that the project could be derailed.  Go to full article

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