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News stories tagged with "ge"

EPA Staff Meets with Environmental Groups on Hudson River PCB Cleanup

Environmental groups met Tuesday with top staff at the EPA to discuss a clean-up of the Hudson River. The talks follow earlier closed-door sessions between the agency and GE. As Brian Mann reports, clean up supporters worry that the project could be derailed.  Go to full article

Homeowners Sue GE Over Toxic Fill

A group of homeowners near the upper Hudson are suing GE, claiming PCBs dumped on their property made them sick. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article

America's Largest Superfund Site: The Hudson River, Part 3

In the final part of our series on PCB contamination in the Hudson River, Brian Mann looks at the damage to the environment...and at GE's claim that the river is slowly cleaning itself.  Go to full article

America?s Largest Superfund Site: The Hudson River, Part 2

This summer, the Environmental Protection Agency will decide whether tons of PCBs should be dredged from the Hudson River. At the center of the debate are questions about the chemical's affect on human health. In this second part of our series on the Hudson River, Brian Mann looks at the volatile mix of science and public opinion that will shape the EPA's decision.  Go to full article

America's Largest Superfund Site: The Hudson River, Pt. 1

New York's Hudson River is the largest toxic waste site in the United States. PCBs dumped decades ago from a pair of General Electric factories summer, the Environmental Protection Agency will decide whether GE have contaminated the Hudson over a two hundred mile area. This should pay to clean up the river--at a cost of $460 million. Environmental groups support the clean up. But the corporation and many local residents are fighting to stop it. In this first of a three-part series, Brian Mann looks at the fierce battle being waged over the Hudson's future.  Go to full article

PCB Contamination of Land May Outstrip Water Pollution

There's compelling new testimony from people living near PCB-laden soil along the Hudson River--there's evidence that the land contamination from the PCBs could be on a much larger scale than the river pollution. Karen Dewitt reports.  Go to full article

Last EPA Hearing on Hudson PCB Dredging

The Environmental Protection Agency held its last public meeting on a plan to dredge toxic PCBs from the Hudson River. The cleanup would cost half a billion dollars. General Electric Corporation has worked hard to discredit the government's proposal. As Brian Mann reports, the debate has left the community bitterly divided.  Go to full article

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