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News stories tagged with "genetics"

<em>Elysia chlorotica</em> is a photosynthetic slug that uses chloroplasts from the algae it eats to make energy from sunlight. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Elysia_chlorotica_%281%29.jpg">Patrick Krug</a>, Cataloging Diversity in the Sacoglossa LifeDesk
Elysia chlorotica is a photosynthetic slug that uses chloroplasts from the algae it eats to make energy from sunlight. Photo: Patrick Krug, Cataloging Diversity in the Sacoglossa LifeDesk

Natural Selections: "Alternative" animals

In general, plants make food from sunlight, and animals fuel themselves by "burning" oxygen. But some animals think outside the box.

Curt stager and Martha Foley look at a photosynthetic slug that hijacks the genetic machinery of the algae in its diet, and at a jellyfish that needs no oxygen, burning the alternative fuels of hydrogen and sulphur.  Go to full article
Sickle cells in the blood (foreground) result from two inherited copies of the gene, and cause anemia. One copy confers resistance to malaria. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/wellcomeimages/">Wellcome Images</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/">some rights reserved</a>
Sickle cells in the blood (foreground) result from two inherited copies of the gene, and cause anemia. One copy confers resistance to malaria. Photo: Wellcome Images, CC some rights reserved

Natural Selections: When evolution GOES WRONG!

Not all evolutionary change is good. Genetic changes can be neutral or harmful, as well as beneficial. And some change can be both, conferring benefit when a single copy of a gene is present, and causing a life-threatening disease when copies are inherited from both parents. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager roll the dice on evolution.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: bird eggs

Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about why birds' eggs look the way they do.  Go to full article

"Biosafety Engineers" for GMO Industry?

Genetic engineering, especially when it comes to food, is a battleground. On one side: people who fear a world of contaminated food, harming humans and the environment. The other side fears we'll miss an opportunity to prevent hunger and disease. Now there's a ground breaking initiative that might produce compromise. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Mary Stucky reports that some researchers think safety can be built into the bio tech industry.  Go to full article

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