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News stories tagged with "global-warming"

New York City, like many large cities in the Northern Hemisphere, lies directly under important atmospheric circulations. Photo: Tony Fischer Photography / via Flickr
New York City, like many large cities in the Northern Hemisphere, lies directly under important atmospheric circulations. Photo: Tony Fischer Photography / via Flickr

How a distant city affects your local weather

Seesawing temperatures, melting snow and rain, heavy winds...and that's just the latest few days of weather extremes. New research may help explain why patterns are changing. It suggests that even if you live thousands of miles away from a major city, it could still be playing a role in your local weather.  Go to full article

Veteran journalist urges new take on climate change

The recession and the presidential election has pushed the issue of climate change far from the headlines. But scientists agree this summer's drought and record sea ice melting in the arctic should sound alarms more than ever.

ABC News' climate change reporter argues journalism needs to find a new way to cover the story. Bill Blakemore has reported on national TV for more than 40 years and for 8 years on climate change. Blakemore is speaking tonight at 7:30 pm at St. Lawrence University as a part of its Climate Change conference.

Blakemore says climate change is a bigger, longer-running story than any newsroom has ever had to tackle, and the first step is moving past appearances of "balance" on whether climate change is real.

Blakemore told David Sommerstein climate scientists have agreed on the five basic facts of global warming.  Go to full article
Michael Mann in the studio with NCPR News Director Martha Foley. Photo: Nora Flaherty
Michael Mann in the studio with NCPR News Director Martha Foley. Photo: Nora Flaherty

Nobel Prize-winning scientist Michael Mann talks climate change politics

The U.S. has just experienced one of the hottest, and most extreme summers of weather in its history. But climate change hasn't been much of an issue in this year's presidential race.

Michael Mann is a Nobel Prize-winning climate scientist at Pennsylvania State University. He's familiar with both the science and politics of climate change. And he's speaking this evening as part of St. Lawrence University's forum on the issue.

People who deny climate change - and want to prove that it's a fraud - have focused much of their effort on Mann. He joined Martha Foley in the studio to talk climate and politics.  Go to full article
A Trans Canada worker inspects a pumping station in Steele City, Nebraska. Photos: Brian Mann
A Trans Canada worker inspects a pumping station in Steele City, Nebraska. Photos: Brian Mann

New York and the US look to Canada for energy, raising big questions about the environment

North Country congressman Bill Owens is praising a Canadian company for its plan to move forward with construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. Owens' backing for the controversial pipeline comes at a time when New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is also pushing a plan to import more hydro-electric power from Quebec.

Canada is already the biggest foreign supplier of energy to the US. And across the political spectrum, American leaders see Canada as a safer alternative to energy suppliers in the Middle East and Central America.

But there are growing questions about the environmental costs to Canada's energy boom and the debate is causing some Canadians to rethink their country's image as one of the world's most environmentally friendly societies. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
This is a really dirty fuel from a greenhouse gas standpoint… It’s a valuable commodity, there is absolutely no incentive to leak that much.

Fracking emissions raise questions about "green" gas

The gas drilling technique known as hydro-fracking has raised fears about water supplies and environmental damage. But as the Innovation Trail's Matt Richmond reports, there's a new conflict about fracking brewing: what effect will emissions from the production process have on global climate change?  Go to full article
(Photo: Jon Rosales)  Shaktoolik in January, from the air as you'd approach the village. It sits on a gravel bar no more than 80 yards wide.
(Photo: Jon Rosales) Shaktoolik in January, from the air as you'd approach the village. It sits on a gravel bar no more than 80 yards wide.

SLU Professor calls for climate assistance for Alaskan villages

Delegates from nearly 200 countries have been meeting over the past two weeks in South Africa for the United Nations Convention on climate change. St. Lawrence University professor Jon Rosales just returned from Durban. He's been advocating on behalf of villages on the Bering Strait, on the west coast of Alaska, which are the focus of his research. Julie Grant has more.  Go to full article
Figure 1.6a Projected change in annual temperature for the 2080s in the Northeast relative to the 1980s baseline period. (NYSERDA Report)
Figure 1.6a Projected change in annual temperature for the 2080s in the Northeast relative to the 1980s baseline period. (NYSERDA Report)

Climate report predicts changes for northern NY farms

One of the lead investigators of the recent report on climate change in New York says the heavy storms this spring and summer, and the mild temperatures this fall will not necessarily be the "new normal" for the north country and Adirondacks. But Cornell University climate researcher Arthur DeGaetano says the heavy rainfall and warm weather could be a glimpse into the future.

The report, released late last month by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is based on the work of more than 50 scientists. It paints a harsh picture of extreme climate events - predicting that upstate New York will have heavier, and more frequent downpours, like those we've seen this year.

The report says the temperature in New York has already warmed 2.4 degrees in the past forty years. It projects a further rise of as much as three degrees by the 2020s, with the temperature steadily warming as much as nine degrees by the 2080s.

DeGaetano says that means northern New York would have a climate more like North Carolina or Georgia. He says the report isn't meant to scare people. It's meant to help them transition along with the climate. DeGaetano says agriculture will be one of the industries most affected. He spoke with Julie Grant.  Go to full article
Clarkson University's Stephen Bird
Clarkson University's Stephen Bird

St. Lawrence County studies climate action plan

This summer, the St. Lawrence County legislature considered a measure to create a climate action plan. The plan would find ways to save money while reducing the county government's carbon footprint. That could include anything from energy audits in county buildings to anti-idling policies in county parking lots. The legislature tabled the matter because it wanted a better cost-benefit analysis of the plan.

Clarkson University professor Stephen Bird hopes to provide that analysis. Bird studies energy and environmental policy. He's working with faculty and students at all four universities in Canton and Potsdam. Bird told David Sommerstein that climate change models project significant changes for the North Country in the future.  Go to full article
Curt Stager taking sediment core samples in Africa (Photo source:  C. Stager)
Curt Stager taking sediment core samples in Africa (Photo source: C. Stager)

North Country scientist rewrites history of global climate change

A researcher in the Adirondacks is literally rewriting the history of global climate change.

Curt Stager, a scientist at Paul Smiths College, is publishing an article later this month in the journal Science that describes an ancient drought that transformed Asia and Africa thousands of years ago.

The "H1 mega-drought" may have wiped out whole tribes of humans, as it dried up rivers and lakes across whole continents.

As Brian Mann reports, Stager thinks that devastating event could be a warning for people living in a new period of global warming.  Go to full article
Ice is thinner and less common on Lake Champlain since the 1970s. (Photo: Brian Mann)
Ice is thinner and less common on Lake Champlain since the 1970s. (Photo: Brian Mann)

Champlain study shows evidence of warming

As 2010 draws to a close, we're revisiting important environmental stories of the year. Climate change tops the list, as scientists struggle to understand how global changes will impact local regions.

This morning, Brian Mann talks with Paul Smith's scientist and researcher Curt Stager. His work often takes him far afield, to sample lake bottoms in Africa and Russia for evidence of ecological changes over geological time.
This year he focussed closer to home, on the impact of climate change in the Champlain Valley. Stager co-authored the study with Adirondack-based journalist Mary Thill. The research was funded by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy in an effort to find out how global warming might affect one relatively small region.

The study shows that since the 1970s, temperatures have already risen in the Champlain Valley by roughly two degrees Fahrenheit. Increased precipitation has also raised the lake level by an average of a foot. Warming is expected to continue over the next century.

Stager told Brian Mann that scientists are struggling to understand the local impacts of climate change.  Go to full article

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