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News stories tagged with "global-warming"

Bill McKibben (Photo:  Nancie Battaglia)
Bill McKibben (Photo: Nancie Battaglia)

A Fresh Start on the Environment: "There's no more going down the road we're on"

This week, we're airing a series of interviews called "A Fresh Start." We've asked some of the country's most compelling thinkers to make recommendations for president-elect Barack Obama. One of the big questions that will face the new administration is the environment and climate change. Back in 1989, author and activist Bill McKibben wrote The End of Nature, one of the first major books about global warming. McKibben spends part of each year in Johnsburg, in the Adirondacks. But he met with Brian Mann yesterday on a suburban street in Rutland, Vermont. With automobiles chugging past and a hailstorm sweeping over the Green Mountains, McKibben said Obama's election offers a chance for real action.  Go to full article

Greenhouse gas credits go to auction

A coalition of 10 northeastern states holds the nation's first sale of pollution credits aimed at curbing global warming today. It's actually an auction for the right to release carbon dioxide. The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI [Reggie], runs the sale. Its goal: to cut the region's carbon pollution by 10% over about a decade. The idea is to make electric power companies buy permits to emit carbon dioxide, which causes global warming. But even supporters of the plan say it's not ambitious enough. As part of a collaboration with Northeast stations, Sacha Pfeiffer of WBUR in Boston reports.  Go to full article

Tupper Lake conference aims to redefine US climate change debate

This week in Tupper Lake, more than two hundred scientists, activists, policy analysts and corporate executives are trying to hammer out a new action plan for climate change. The conference at the Wild Center lacks some of the political heft of earlier meetings in Europe and Asia. But organizers hope that the closed-door session will allow more creative and ambitious thinking. As Brian Mann reports, the goal is to develop an action plan for the U.S. that will help head off the worst impacts of global warming.  Go to full article

Tupper Lake conference aims to redefine US climate change debate

This week in Tupper Lake, more than two hundred scientists, activists, policy analysts and corporate executives are trying to hammer out a new action plan for climate change. The conference at the Wild Center lacks some of the political heft of earlier meetings in Europe and Asia. But organizers hope that the closed-door session will allow more creative and ambitious thinking. As Brian Mann reports, the goal is to develop an action plan for the U.S. that will help head off the worst impacts of global warming.  Go to full article

Tupper Lake climate conference aims to push global warming debate

Scientists and policy-makers from around the world are gathering this morning in Tupper Lake. The "American Response to Climate Change Conference," held at the Wild Center, aims to develop an action plan for global warming. Brian Mann spoke with conference director Kate Fish. She says participants hope to translate scientific knowledge into action.

NOTE: This week's gathering is closed to the public. The Wild Center will reopen on Friday.  Go to full article
The wild Rupert River will soon be altered radically.
The wild Rupert River will soon be altered radically.

On a wild Quebec river, wolves, caribou and the encroachment of industry

Last November, Brian Mann reported on plans to dam and divert the massive Rupert River in northern Quebec. The project, developed by the provincial utility, Hydro-Quebec, will provide hydroelectricity to consumers in New York and Vermont. His story was recognized with an Edward R. Murrow Award. Last week, Brian returned to paddle the Rupert again. He made the trip as part of a documentary project called "Encounters." Here's his reporter's notebook.  Go to full article
Karen Roy co-author, <i>Acid Rain in the Adirondacks</i>
Karen Roy co-author, Acid Rain in the Adirondacks

National climate change debate builds on Adirondack fight against acid rain

This week, the US Senate will debate a landmark bill that aims to sharply cut the nation's greenhouse gas pollution. The climate change measure is modeled closely after a policy that was first used to curb acid rain in the Adirondacks. The so-called "cap and trade" system would set new limits on carbon pollution. But it would also leave industry to decide how to reach the goals. As Brian Mann reports, the measure puts the Adirondacks back at the center of the national environmental debate.  Go to full article

Wind Power: How "green" is it?

Over the last couple years, we've reported extensively on the explosion of wind power in the North Country and the passionate debate it's kindled. Are the wind turbines going up across the North Country ugly or beautiful? Do they make too much noise? Kill too many birds or bats? You can find a complete archive of stories on our website, ncpr.org. Today, we're going to put those issues aside and focus on one question: does electricity produced by the wind actually reduce carbon emissions and help stop global warming? In other words, how "green" is wind power really? David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Focus the Nation draws in North Country campuses
Focus the Nation draws in North Country campuses

Students uncertain about life after climate change

Last week, more than 1500 college campuses around the country joined in an effort called "Focus the Nation." The goal was to convince politicians and the public that climate change should be a top issue in this election year. As Brian Mann reports, students and faculty at St. Lawrence University agree that the planet is getting warmer and that humans are to blame. But they're still not sure what they or their leaders should do about it.  Go to full article
Lower water levels on the Great Lakes make some channels such as the Muskegon River too shallow for big freighters to enter fully loaded. (Photo by Lester Graham)
Lower water levels on the Great Lakes make some channels such as the Muskegon River too shallow for big freighters to enter fully loaded. (Photo by Lester Graham)

Weather squeezes Great Lakes

Historic low water levels are an emerging concern for shippers and everyone else who uses the St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes. The St. Lawrence was more than a foot lower than normal last fall. Lakes Michigan and Huron are even worse. The water is so low that 1000-foot cargo ships are running aground. The issue appeared on Governor Spitzer's radar last week in his State of Upstate speech. He called on the legislature to pass the Great Lakes Compact, which would limit water diversions out of the Lakes. Illinois and Minnesota are the only states to ratify the compact so far. All eight Great Lakes states must pass it before it can go before Congress for final passage. Drought in the southeast and southwest are adding new urgency to the compact. There's debate about whether the low water levels are just part of the historic ups and downs of the Great Lakes, or if it's the effects of global warming. Lester Graham reports from Lake Michigan's Muskegon River, a trouble spot for some of the big ships.  Go to full article

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