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News stories tagged with "gmo"

Photo: <a href="http://wilpf.org/files/image_3.jpg">WILPF</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: WILPF, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Questionnaire results in on GMO labeling

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) -- Vermont attorney general says a questionnaire has found that most participants think information about genetically engineered food should be placed near the product's nutrition facts label or ingredients list.

The survey was conducted after the legislature passed a law requiring the labelling of genetically modified foods. The law takes effect in mid-2016.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://wilpf.org/files/image_3.jpg">WILPF</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: WILPF, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Cuomo says GMO food labeling not part of session talks in Albany

Governor Cuomo says there are no concrete talks underway in Albany that might lead to new regulations requiring labels on genetically modified foods.

Some lawmakers and activists want a policy in New York similar to the one now being implemented in Vermont that offers consumers more information about GMO ingredients.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://wilpf.org/files/image_3.jpg">WILPF</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: WILPF, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

New York is on the path to labeling GMOs, too

Today, Vermont will become the first state to enact a GMO labeling law. Many people want New York to follow suit. Foods with GMOs, or genetically modified organisms, are tweaked for certain characteristics, like disease resistance or size. GMOs are already on the market, in crops like soybean and corn.

Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal, a Democrat from New York City, is the lead sponsor of the New York GMO labeling bill. "The bill, actually, is a consumer right-to-know bill. Because people who purchase food for themselves and their family should know and want to know," Rosenthal said yesterday on the public radio program Capitol Pressroom.  Go to full article
A rally to support a bill to label GMO foods in Connecticut last year. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ctsenatedems/8777078498/">CT Senate Democrats</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
A rally to support a bill to label GMO foods in Connecticut last year. Photo: CT Senate Democrats, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

GMO labeling bill passes legislative hurdle in NY

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) A bill that would require labels on food products containing ingredients from genetically modified crops has passed a hurdle in the New York Assembly.

The measure was endorsed Tuesday by the Assembly's Consumer Affairs and Protection Committee. A vote of the full Assembly has not been scheduled.  Go to full article
Corn field. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/planmygreen/2675568751/sizes/z/in/photolist-55qZnH-bfofwD-dGNrkA-beYJnK-63LZ2U-8HDeJF-6GbW5-9YJvnJ-czRDem-6We4UA-eewiJV-4C3kF5-2646Jd-eewjQc-fMjAUL-beYM1n-4PyEtt-gUjULQ-2pSP5G-8zDeLm-cyUjpw-fsYiiv-5csq5g-2NwTUm-aGiKEt-4KyjvA-aixLKC-dpXLfz-bFt1zX-2u9i3q-3nJSPG-deoJxq-4VRPDZ-4CVnHk-JbVrz-8KkFPs-axMX7G-5aBFhp-5yRjVU-cSTXQN-4VgYUW-2Zg6mX-8ivjiQ-dnzy3J-d36eKN-4wJrq5-4Ehkv-512oKM/">Rastoney</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Corn field. Photo: Rastoney, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

What you need to know about Vermont's GMO bill

Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin plans to sign the nation's first GMO labeling bill into law this week. Sarah Harris spoke with Laurie Beyranevand, associate director of the Center for Agriculture and Food Systems at Vermont Law School, about what the bill means for food producers and consumers.  Go to full article

Lawmakers ask: Would Vermont be sued over GMO labels?

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) A Vermont Senate committee is set to address the question of whether Vermont would be sued by biotech or food industries -- and if the state could win -- if it passed a law requiring labels on genetically modified foods.

A bill requiring the labels currently is before the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is scheduled to hear from legal experts about whether a law requiring labeling would withstand a legal challenge.  Go to full article
Chip Taylor, one of America's leading Monarch butterfly experts and activists, visited Tupper Lake over the weekend. Photo:  Brian Mann
Chip Taylor, one of America's leading Monarch butterfly experts and activists, visited Tupper Lake over the weekend. Photo: Brian Mann

Monarch butterfly population plummets

This summer, scientists and naturalists say the population of Monarch butterflies here in the North Country, Vermont and Canada is down sharply.

The great migration of Monarch butterflies from Mexico to our part of the world has faced a lot of threats over the years, everything from habitat loss to climate change.

But researchers say the latest fear is that new farm herbicides and roadside mowing techniques could be wiping out stands of milkweed -- a plant that monarchs need in order to reproduce.

Over the weekend, one of the country's top butterfly experts, Chip Taylor, visited the Wild Center in Tupper Lake. He sat down with Brian Mann.  Go to full article
Sandy and Aaron Stauffer with their herd. Photo: Julie Grant
Sandy and Aaron Stauffer with their herd. Photo: Julie Grant

Why milk containers send mixed messages

When you go to the supermarket dairy aisle, there are so many milks to choose from: different brands, fat contents, and prices. One thing they all have in common is a label that says something like "our farmers pledge they do not inject their cows with artificial growth hormone." The containers also state that there's no difference in the milk from cows with or without those hormones.

So what's going on here? Why are our milk containers sending mixed messages? And what does it mean for North Country dairy farms that use growth hormones on their cows?  Go to full article

Genetically engineered crops in your stuff

The soda-pop you drink, the t-shirt you wear, the cooking oil you use - all might contain genetically engineered material. Lester Graham reports on a continuing trend in agriculture.  Go to full article

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