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News stories tagged with "greek-yogurt"

Alpina's shiny new Greek yogurt plant is right across the industrial park from another new yogurt plant. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Alpina's shiny new Greek yogurt plant is right across the industrial park from another new yogurt plant. Photo: David Sommerstein.

How the 'Silicon Valley of Yogurt' is reshaping dairy farming

It's been about a year since Governor Cuomo convened his Yogurt Summit. He urged the state's dairy farmers to ramp up to meet the growing demand for milk from the booming Greek yogurt industry.

New York has eclipsed California as the number one yogurt producer in the country. And there are no signs of the growth slowing down.

David Sommerstein went to western New York to visit one of the brand new Greek yogurt plants that have opened recently to see how they're reshaping New York dairy.  Go to full article
Dairy farmer Mike Kiechle of Philadelphia, NY, spreads manure from his tractor. He's the kind of small farmer the new rules are trying to target, but he says he doubts he'll grow his herd bigger. Photo: David Sommerstein
Dairy farmer Mike Kiechle of Philadelphia, NY, spreads manure from his tractor. He's the kind of small farmer the new rules are trying to target, but he says he doubts he'll grow his herd bigger. Photo: David Sommerstein

Will the Greek yogurt boom help dairy farmers?

Last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced New York will be one of four states in a test program to include Greek yogurt in school lunches.

State officials praised the news - as a new way to induce kids to eat their protein, and as a way to continue to fuel the Greek yogurt boom for New York dairy farmers.

New York has invested millions of dollars in tax breaks into new and expanding yogurt plants. Governor Andrew Cuomo eased environmental rules to encourage 200 cow dairy farms to become 300 cow dairy farms and make more milk.

Experts say New York farmers will have to boost milk production by 15%, or 2 billion pounds each year, to keep up with demand.

So does New York have a milk shortage? And are farmers stepping up it fill it?
David Sommerstein reports the answers lie in cream cheese, Old McDonald, and something called the Chobani Paradox.  Go to full article

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