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News stories tagged with "h1n1"

Individual receiving the flu vaccine. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/56037948@N03/8135365395/">NHS Employers</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Individual receiving the flu vaccine. Photo: NHS Employers, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Two flu-related deaths confirmed in central NY

SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) Health officials say two central New York residents have died of complications from the flu strain that's hitting young and middle-aged adults hard this year.  Go to full article

H1N1 flu still around

You might think the flu season is over, but H1N1 flu is still around. Rebecca Williams reports health officials still want you to get vaccinated against the virus.  Go to full article

BREAKING: North Country's first swine flu death

The H1N1 virus--or swine flu--claimed its first victim in the North Country. Health officials in Clinton County say an adult--who was not immunized with the H1N1 vaccine--died this week after being admitted to the CVPH Medical Center for complications from a flu-like illness. The county health department has not released the patient's name, gender or other details. Laurie Williams is coordinator of Clinton County's health education unit. She says complications and even deaths due to the H1N1 flu strain are expected, but she tells Jonathan Brown that most people exposed to this virus will recover quickly.  Go to full article
Researchers will create "clouds" of infectious microbes in this containment area (Source:  Trudeau Institute)
Researchers will create "clouds" of infectious microbes in this containment area (Source: Trudeau Institute)

New Saranac Lake lab will push frontiers of disease research, cautiously

Yesterday we reported on the growth of the Trudeau Institute in Saranac Lake, which is adding three new research teams. Over the next few months, Trudeau Institute will certify its new research wing, named for former state Senator Ronald Stafford. Once it's brought on-line, the facility will be closed to the public forever. Even most of the Institute's staff won't be allowed inside. That's because the researchers working in the lab will handle some of world's deadliest diseases, including airborne strains of tuberculosis and influenza. Brian Mann was allowed a rare glimpse inside the lab and has our story.  Go to full article

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