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News stories tagged with "halpern"

Halpern divides her time between Vermont and the Adirondacks
Halpern divides her time between Vermont and the Adirondacks

Author Sue Halpern: What we remember, why we forget

North Country writer Sue Halpern has spent decades exploring some of the most complicated tangles of science and human experience. She's written about the migrations of monarch butterflies, and the intimate experience of solitude. Her new book, Can't Remember What I Forgot, goes to the frontier of modern brain science. She decodes the way the brain stories memory and looks at new treatment for diseases like Alzheimer's. Halpern spoke this week with Brian Mann.  Go to full article
A scene from "Virtual Iraq" (Source:  University of Southern California)
A scene from "Virtual Iraq" (Source: University of Southern California)

"Virtual Iraq" aims to help soldiers overcome Post Traumatic Stress

New Pentagon figures show 40,000 U.S. troops have been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder since 2003. But Army officials believe many more are keeping their illness secret. A study released last month by the Rand Corporation puts the number much higher. It found that 300,000 - one in five veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan -- suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or major depression. Army Surgeon General Eric Schoomaker says officials are encouraging troops to get help, military or civilian. Fort Drum in Watertown has begun expanding its mental health programs. The VA is also scrambling to create new therapy methods to treat PTSD. In the May 19 issue of The New Yorker magazine, North Country writer Sue Halpern profiled one experimental new treatment called "Virtual Iraq."

Halpern told Brian Mann the story of one Marine named Travis Boyd who used the "virtual reality" computer simulation to heal from his wartime experience.  Go to full article
"You can't complain about what's going on in this country if you haven't<br />done anything to try to change it." -Patricia Tuma<br />Waitress, North Creek, NY (Photos courtesy of Face of Democracy)
"You can't complain about what's going on in this country if you haven't
done anything to try to change it." -Patricia Tuma
Waitress, North Creek, NY (Photos courtesy of Face of Democracy)

Putting ballots in the hands of young people

America's political culture has a deep impact on the lives of young people, from the war in Iraq to education policy to health care. But it's tough convincing young Americans that voting and civic involvement really matter. Sue Halpern is a journalist and writer in the North Country who took on that challenge. Her "The Face of Democracy" project is designed to connect students with the ritual of voting. An exhibit from the project is on display this week at the Tannery Pond Community Center in North Creek. A group of her students will gather for a reception tomorrow evening. Halpern spoke about "Face of Democracy" with Brian Mann.  Go to full article
TJ Volchek conducts an interview (Source:  FOD)
TJ Volchek conducts an interview (Source: FOD)

Adirondack teens talk democracy

Last Tuesday, kids across the U.S. were talking with Americans about the importance of voting. The national project was organized by journalist and writer Sue Halpern, who spends much of year in Johnsburg, in the central Adirondacks. Halpern says it was a chance for students to hear from people who see voting as a duty and a crucial part of their lives. But as Brian Mann reports, their idealism played out this year against one of the nastiest and most controversial campaigns on record.  Go to full article

Four Wings and a Prayer, Sue Halpern

North Creek author Sue Halpern reads from her book about monarch butterflies, called Four Wings And A Prayer.  Go to full article

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