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News stories tagged with "health-care"

Doctors, businesses, politicians gather in Lake George
Doctors, businesses, politicians gather in Lake George

Experts say doctor shortage threatens North Country

Governor Eliot Spitzer says he'll hold a public hearing on health care next week at the Glens Falls Civic Center. According to the Department of Health, the gathering on Wednesday will be the first of a series of statewide hearings meant to focus attention on expanding insurance coverage and improving the health care system. Governor Spitzer and Health Commissioner Richard Daines will both attend. Health experts in the North Country say they hope to focus attention on this region's desperate doctor shortage. Some of the region's best physicians and administrators held their own summit yesterday in Lake George. They warned that the North Country's network of quality health care is beginning to unravel. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Group sees looming doctor shortage in North Country

What happens if you have health insurance, you have the money to pay for a doctor visit, but you can't find a doctor? Experts say that's a real possibility in northern New York, if current trends continue. The number of primary care physicians, the doctors who provide the most basic and the most essential care, is dwindling fast in rural America. As Brian Mann reports, a group of health care administrators, doctors and government are meeting this morning in Lake George to try to find ways to recruit and keep doctors in the North Country.

Program Note: Tomorrow during regional news, Brian will have a complete report, including a conversation with Dr. Barbara Starfield from Johns Hopkins University. She's an international authority on primary medical care in underserved areas who summers in the Adirondacks.  Go to full article

Hospital closures get a review by lawmakers

Legislative leaders say they want to revisit the Berger Commission report that recommended that many hospitals around the state be closed or merged. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article

Ranks of uninsured grow at alarming rate

A recent survey by the St Lawrence County Health Initiative found more than 33% of residents don't have any health insurance. State and federal studies indicate only 10% are uninsured. The discrepancy has a lot to do with those polled, according to Ruth Fishbeck. She's Executive Director of the advocacy group. She says federal and state studies include people of all ages, from the cradle to the grave, and she worries that the government presents a skewed view of health coverage. Fishbeck tells Jonathan Brown that health professionals needed to know how many people have coverage, and how reliable it is. That drove the Health Initiative to draft their survey. More than 1500 people between 19 and 64 responded.  Go to full article
Rep. Kirsten Gillibrand
Rep. Kirsten Gillibrand

Gillibrand tours "substandard" Walter Reed Hospital

Investigations have begun into substandard conditions at Walter Reed Hospital. Many of America's injured soldiers, including National Guardsmen and servicemen from Fort Drum, are treated at the facility. The Washington Post has reported that some outpatient dormitories at the hospital were filthy and infested with vermin. Democratic Congresswoman Kirsten Gillibrand toured Walter Reed yesterday. She spoke with Brian Mann shortly her visit.  Go to full article

Baby booms and other complications: local health care challenges

The 5th Annual Rural Health Care Conference is in its second day in Chatauqua. This year, all the discussions take place in the shadow of the New York State Right Sizing Commission. The commission was formed earlier this year to take a comprehensive look at health services across the state. It's likely some hospitals will close, and some services consolidated as a result of its recommendations. Patty Bishop looks at the big picture in this region. She is director of the Northern New York Rural Health Care Alliance, based in Watertown. She said local providers and agencies will have their say before the right-sizing commission makes its recommendation. But she told Gregory Warner the challenges the rural health care community faces are special, and she worries that message won't be heard clearly. And she said the North Country has particular problems because of Ft. Drum.  Go to full article

Keeseville firefighters awarded for Ausable Chasm rescue

This month the Fireman's Association of New York State gave their inaugural award for emergency services to the Keeseville Fire Department. The award was for a rescue last March at the Ausable Chasm. The volunteer firefighters thought they were going to a dead-on-the-scene scenario but when they climbed down the chasm in treacherous conditions they found the person was alive. They rescued the man, Dr. Charles Delise. Gregory Warner spoke with Chief Lenny Martin, one of the rescuers.  Go to full article

Faith Healing, Under the Tent

It's tent revival season in the North Country. Gregory Warner stopped by one tent off the Lake Ozonia Road. It was operated by the Christian Camp Ozonia. He watched a faith healer at work. And then he followed up...  Go to full article

StoryCorps Preserves Hospice Pioneer's Legacy

The StoryCorps booth opens at the Canton village green this morning. StoryCorps helps people set down a record of their lives - the little details as well as the broader, deeper strokes.
Lots of reasons to do that, of course. With permission, the interviews are archived in the Library of Congress. Some are excerpted on public radio. But it's the personal archive that's most meaningful - the voices and memories that may fade, particularly after death. Zelda Foster was an early pioneer in hospice and end-of-life care. For 40 years she fought for people's right to die with dignity. She believed in facing death with honesty and preparedness. For Zelda Foster that also meant recording her story at a StoryCorps booth. Foster died Tuesday. Gregory Warner has this remembrance.  Go to full article

A Day in Mental Health Court

The Champlain Valley chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness gives its top award to Judge Penelope Clute in Plattsburgh tonight. It's an unusual partnership. The criminal justice system isn't well suited to dealing with the mentally ill. Jails and prisons are the de facto asylums of our times. Judge Clute is breaking ground in Clinton County, with a court specifically designed for people with severe mental illness. Mental health court codifies a team approach that brings the mental health and the justice systems together. It gives people with mental illness new opportunities to stay out of jail, and the "system" new leverage to intervene. There are only eight other courts like it in the state. Gregory Warner went to court, and has this story.  Go to full article

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