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News stories tagged with "heard-up-north"

The Pierce family of Heuvelton, with their replica of the Remington Tavern, in 2011. Photo: Carolyn Pierce
The Pierce family of Heuvelton, with their replica of the Remington Tavern, in 2011. Photo: Carolyn Pierce

Heard Up North: Family remembers 10 years of gingerbread

Traditional Arts in Upstate New York opens its 10th annual Gingerbread Contest and Exhibit Saturday in Canton. The Pierce family of Heuvelton will have an entry, just like every other year the contest has been around.

Julie Grant met recently with Carolyn Pierce and a handful of her seven children, who range in age from seven to 20. Reggie, the oldest, is now in college. He was 10 the first year they entered. That year they attempted a gingerbread replica of their church in Heuvelton.

In the years that have followed, they've made the Remington Tavern, the Quiltmaker's gift castle, and their own barn. They've even won the TAUNY contest a few times.

Mother Carolyn Pierce says it was Aunt Eloise, also known as Faye White, who first encouraged them to get into gingerbread making.  Go to full article
Emily Holt at work, summer 2011. Looking over her shoulder is the Rev. Thomas Brown of the Parish of the Epiphany in Winchester, Mass. She said he had no idea the embroidery would take over two years to complete. Photo courtesy Caroline Larson
Emily Holt at work, summer 2011. Looking over her shoulder is the Rev. Thomas Brown of the Parish of the Epiphany in Winchester, Mass. She said he had no idea the embroidery would take over two years to complete. Photo courtesy Caroline Larson

Heard Up North: Emily Holt

In today's Heard Up North, we meet a woman who's one of the last experts in ecclesiastical embroidery in America. Emily Holt has spent 60 years illuminating church altars and vestments with specialized and painstaking hand-work.

Martha Foley visited her summer work space in the Thousand Islands, where she was finishing up her latest project. After two and a half years of work, she hopes to have a reproduction of an altarpiece for her church done for Christmas.  Go to full article
Jigsaw puzzle. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/hadsie/">Scott Hadfield</a>. CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Jigsaw puzzle. Photo: Scott Hadfield. CC some rights reserved

Heard Up North: One thousand easy pieces

At McBrier Park Manor, a retirement community in Hermon, the common room is simply laid out: a sofa, a few chairs, a table, and a TV. But every closet and set of drawers is packed to the brim with boxes of jigsaw puzzles.  Go to full article
The Magnolia Warbler, one of the species of birds on the decline in the Adirondack region. Photo: Audubon Society
The Magnolia Warbler, one of the species of birds on the decline in the Adirondack region. Photo: Audubon Society

Heard Up North: Lecture hall becomes a wild forest

Last night veteran journalist Bill Blakemore gave the keynote presentation at St. Lawrence University's Climate Change Forum. That talk has been publicized all over the North Country, and Blakemore appeared on NCPR Thursday, so you may have known about that already. But chances are, you didn't know about the surprise flash mob.

Earlier in the semester, the organizing committee for the Forum asked St. Lawrence art professor Peter Nelson to come up with an installation related to the theme of climate change. But as Nelson was coming up with an idea, it dawned on him that the materials and energy needed to create a typical installation would be wasteful, and go against the whole spirit of the event. So instead, he came up with a way to transform Eben Holden Hall into a forest grove, using only the human voice.  Go to full article
The student center at St. Lawrence University.
The student center at St. Lawrence University.

Heard Up North: Looking for the heart of Saturday night

The student center at St. Lawrence University has a vaulted wooden ceiling and a wide column of open space down the middle, giving it the feel of an Adirondack concert hall.

Late on Saturday night, the bottom floor is noisy with groups of friends getting pizza or playing pool; the ground floor is dotted with pairs of students leaning into each other; and on the top floor, a few lone students are scattered in giant armchairs silently studying or texting. And on some Saturday nights, one young man comes up to the top floor and plays the piano.  Go to full article
Curt Christman of North Country Memorials. Photo: David Sommerstein
Curt Christman of North Country Memorials. Photo: David Sommerstein

Heard Up North: Etching memorials at Seniorama

You might think that selling custom made gravestones would be a little uncomfortable at a gathering of senior citizens. But that's exactly what one man was doing at the recent Seniorama in Massena, and he's today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Quilters Terry Whittaker and Christina Nicholson - Sisters of Perpetual Needling - in Ogdensburg on Sunday.
Quilters Terry Whittaker and Christina Nicholson - Sisters of Perpetual Needling - in Ogdensburg on Sunday.

Heard Up North: Sisters of Perpetual Needling

Historical re-enactors are serious about battle strategies, muskets and cannons. And for many, it's all about period clothing. Todd Moe toured Lighthouse Point in Ogdensburg on Sunday during the Founders' Day event.

The annual commemoration of the French and Indian War featured battle re-enactments on land and water, a bateau race and a colonial trade fair. That's where Todd found two Ontario women hunched over a loom and serious about an 18th century technique known as "whole cloth quilting," where the quilting itself is the decoration. They are today's "Heard Up North."  Go to full article
Arian Maury riding her horse Champ.
Arian Maury riding her horse Champ.

Heard Up North: An afternoon at the horse barn

Horseback riding was once our main form of transportation, but today the people who ride do it because they love the animal and the sport. We spoke with local equestrian Arian Maury as she was getting her horse ready for a ride. She works as a secretary during the day and spends every evening she can at the barn. She shared her connection to her horse, Champ, with us.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: Welcoming summer by roasting marshmallows

Camping is one of the pleasures of the warmer months in the North Country. For little people it can mean a lot of firsts: the first time sleeping in a tent, and hanging by a campfire. Julie Grant and her 3-year-old daughter joined their friends Aviva Gold and Steve Dilger and their 3-old daughter for the girls' first experience roasting marshmallows.  Go to full article
Peggy McAdam-Cambridge enjoys the new jump. Photo: Jasmine Wallace
Peggy McAdam-Cambridge enjoys the new jump. Photo: Jasmine Wallace

Heard Up North: building a horse jump

Peggy McAdam-Cambridge owns a horse farm a few miles outside Canton.
Honey Dew Acres will host whats known as an eventing competition this weekend for local equestrians. One of those events is cross-country jumping. A series of natural-looking obstacles in a field tests the horse's, and rider's, endurance and bravery.

Peggy likes a rustic look for her course. Our intern, Jasmine Wallace, found her in a converted cow barn building a new jump. With a mare and foal watching from one side, and a pile of tools on the other, Peggy made quick work of it.  Go to full article

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