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News stories tagged with "heard-up-north"

Greg Sullivan and Dave Drummond, with the lodge successfully up on blocks behind them.
Greg Sullivan and Dave Drummond, with the lodge successfully up on blocks behind them.

Heard Up North: movers take care

Upper Canada Village will officially open Its first additional building in 14 years tomorrow: a "new" lodge to expand living displays of life along the St Lawrence in the 1860s. The building was rescued from the Rideau River village of Kars, home turf for our correspondent, Lucy Martin. Townspeople there got a free show back in January as the shuttered structure was jacked up, loaded onto a flatbed, and trucked down the road to the living history museum in Morrisburg. Just two guys handled most of the move: Greg Sullivan, the quiet one, from Chesterville, and Dave Drummond of Almonte, who didn't mind doing a little play-by-play as he began to jack the building onto a stack of wooden blocks.  Go to full article

Heard Up North?way Up North: the Ekoomiaks

Among other things, William Ekoomiak is an old-time fiddler, a storyteller and a carver. His older sister Sarah is a long-time resident of Wakefield, Quebec and an expert beader. Both are often called upon to share their deep knowledge of Inuit culture and language. Sarah was born near Hudson Bay in 1933. She was the oldest child in a large family. Her life mirrors many of the challenges faced by inhabitants of the far North as cultural change and migration transformed the region. Lucy Martin chatted with William between sets at the most recent Arts Alive event in Ottawa.  Go to full article
The Woods Inn, Inlet, after its restoration (Source:  Woods Inn website)
The Woods Inn, Inlet, after its restoration (Source: Woods Inn website)

Heard Up North: Historic inn restored in Inlet

Today, we have a Heard Up North from the town of Inlet, where a historic inn on the shore of Fourth Lake has come back to life after more than three decades. Joedda McClain runs the Woods Inn. Her Heard Up North was produced by Brian Mann.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: Sam the Bugler summons the ponies

One of the most iconic sounds in the North Country is the "Call to the Post" at the Saratoga Horse track. It turns out that for the last fifteen years, one guy has been blowing that little tune. He's today's Heard Up North. Note: Sam prefers not to use his last name. He lives on Long Island and plays in a rock and roll band in his spare time.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: After the scrum, singing Ireland?s Call

Today's Heard Up North features the Shamrock Sizzlers, a mixed team of Protstants and Catholics from Northern Ireland. They sang "Ireland's Call," a song of unity commissioned by the Irish Rugby Football Union, at the Lake Placid Pub. They were recorded by Brian Mann.  Go to full article
Timber rattlesnake (Source: Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks)
Timber rattlesnake (Source: Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks)

Heard Up North: A nervous timber rattlesnake

This week, we're spotlighting the Lake George region of the Adirondacks. One of the most iconic creatures in that part of the southeastern Adirondacks is the timber rattlesnake. They're the subject of today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: Catching a wild brookie in northern Ontario

Catching a spirited trout is an early-summer tradition in the North Country. A few weeks ago, Lake Clear guide Brian McDonnell went even farther north for his sport, paddling a wild river in northern Ontario. His postcard, produced by Brian Mann, is today's Heard Up North. Their trip on the Wakweyokastic River was part of the James Bay Expedition, sponsored by the St. Lawrence University Outdoor Program.  Go to full article
Tracy Brown and Kendra Tagoona, two of the Inuit performers.
Tracy Brown and Kendra Tagoona, two of the Inuit performers.

Heard Up North: learn Inuit throat-singing

Today a Heard Up North from WAY up North. Inuit throat singing is traditional entertainment from a time and place where people had to amuse themselves. It's a copy-cat game, really, full of invention and rhythm. It takes a lot of breath control and a tough throat. With artists chipping rock statues near by, sisters Lynda and Tracy Brown and Kendra Tagoona taught the audience how to throat-sing at a recent Inuit event in Ottawa.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: Raising the flag

This Heard Up North starts with a sound; it's the rope that raises and lowers the American flag outside the building that houses our studios in Canton. Kevin Laurence handles maintenance and on this day the flag went back to full staff after it was lowered the week before for the victims of the Virginia Tech shooting. When the flag is at half-staff, it's right outside the little window in our on-air studio. It's another reminder (in addition to the news and people talking about the event) that there is a grief felt by just about everyone. Jonathan Brown wondered how it felt to lower the flag, knowing that just pulling on a section of rope signals that grief.  Go to full article
Garnett and Jeanie Barr, in front of a bookshelf of diaries.
Garnett and Jeanie Barr, in front of a bookshelf of diaries.

Heard Up North: A life, one diary at a time

For today's Heard Up North, David Sommerstein was out doing a story last year in Depauville, north of Watertown. He visited a couple who were struggling to keep their home warm in winter. One thing he noticed in the living room had nothing to do with heat: two bookshelves lined with completed diaries, more piled on a desk. Everyday entries documenting the life of a retired dairyman...  Go to full article

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