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News stories tagged with "herbicide"

Chip Taylor, one of America's leading Monarch butterfly experts and activists, visited Tupper Lake over the weekend. Photo:  Brian Mann
Chip Taylor, one of America's leading Monarch butterfly experts and activists, visited Tupper Lake over the weekend. Photo: Brian Mann

Monarch butterfly population plummets

This summer, scientists and naturalists say the population of Monarch butterflies here in the North Country, Vermont and Canada is down sharply.

The great migration of Monarch butterflies from Mexico to our part of the world has faced a lot of threats over the years, everything from habitat loss to climate change.

But researchers say the latest fear is that new farm herbicides and roadside mowing techniques could be wiping out stands of milkweed -- a plant that monarchs need in order to reproduce.

Over the weekend, one of the country's top butterfly experts, Chip Taylor, visited the Wild Center in Tupper Lake. He sat down with Brian Mann.  Go to full article

Whose lawn is lusher?

Lots of people love a full, lush lawn. Personal green space for the kids, a tidy, open vista around the house, but it isn't easy, keeping a monoculture like grass. Lawns DO like a rainy summer like this one. And fertilizers and herbicides might help. But there's concern about water pollution from lawn chemicals. Julie Grant reports that some experts say you can use them, just don't over-use them.  Go to full article

Cautious Approval for New Herbicide

Corn farmers in the Midwest could soon join their neighbors in using a new herbicide known as "Balance Pro". The EPA approved the herbicide for most of the Midwest four years ago. At that time, Minnesota, along with Michigan and Wisconsin, rejected it, until more studies could be done. Now those states are reconsidering. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Stephanie Hemphill explains.  Go to full article

Milfoil in Lake Bonaparte

The Lake George Park Commission is seeking permits from the state DEC and the APA to use the herbicide Sonar to get rid of Eurasian Milfoil in Lake Gorge. But the Adk Council says the lake-choking weed is dying on it own. Bill Peters of the Lake Bonaparte Conservation Club is Jefferson County says his community faced the same problems with milfoil in their lake. Peters says they turned to using weevils to control the weed. Martha Foley reports.  Go to full article

Watermilfoil Herbicide Talks Underway in Lake George

Private talks are underway over a plan to use a chemical herbicide in Lake George. The chemical--known as "sonar"--could help in the fight against Eurasian watermilfoil. Critics say it will also kill native plants that are already endangered. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Judge OKs Watermilfoil Herbicide Use

A state judge says the use of an herbicide in Lake George wouldn't violate a New York law protecting rare and endangered plants. As Brian Mann reports, the ruling may boost efforts to use chemicals to control invasive species.  Go to full article

Adirondack Council Sues to Delay Lake George Herbicide Hearings

The Adirondack Council has filed suit to delay hearings into the proposed use of SONAR, an herbicide, to combat the invasive species watermilfoil in Lake George. Martha Foley reports.  Go to full article

Lake George Debates Watermilfoil Herbicide Use

A hearing was held last night in Lake George to discuss the use of the chemical SONAR to kill the invasive weed watermilfoil in the lake. Environmentalists say it would hurt water quality, while local government officials favor using the herbicide. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

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