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News stories tagged with "hispanics"

"Return To Sender"?Julia Alvarez portrays illegal dairy farmworkers in young adult terms

Mexican and central American immigrants--most in this country illegally--have become a fixture on hundreds of dairy farms in northern New York and Vermont. In fact, they've become crucial to many farms' survival. Meanwhile, the farmers themselves, and their families, are in involved in a degree of illegality they're not used to. It's this underground world meeting sanguine farm life that's the backdrop for the latest novel by Julia Alvarez. It's a book for teen readers called Return To Sender. Alvarez is one of America's most famous Latina authors. She wrote How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents and In the Time of the Butterflies. Alvarez was born in the Dominican Republic, but she's lived the majority of her life in Vermont. She's taught at Middlebury College since the 1980s. She told David Sommerstein when she first moved to Vermont, there were very few latino faces.  Go to full article

Small protest to hispanic laborers

There's been little public opposition in the North Country to the growing number of Hispanic workers on dairy farms. But earlier this month, a small group protested outside the St. Lawrence County Farm Bureau's "A Day at the Farm" event at Jon Greenwood's dairy in Canton. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article

Pataki Warmly Greeted by Hispanics at State Conference

Governor Pataki received a warm welcome from Latinos gathered at the state capitol for an annual conference sponsored by Hispanic state lawmakers. Pataki also announced that the state Senate would change its newly drawn districts and add one seat in a district dominated by people from the Dominican Republic. Karen Dewitt reports.  Go to full article

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