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News stories tagged with "homeland-security"

NYS Sen. John DeFrancisco (R-Syracuse). Photo: Durrie Bouscaren/WRVO
NYS Sen. John DeFrancisco (R-Syracuse). Photo: Durrie Bouscaren/WRVO

Could Syracuse be the home of the new NYS homeland security college?

New York state plans to create the nation's first college dedicated to homeland security and emergency preparedness, which backers say is a necessary measure given the major storms and terrorist threats the state has dealt with.

And there are efforts to headquarter that new college in Syracuse.  Go to full article
The Via Rail/Amtrak train "Maple Leaf" (shown here near Niagara Falls) makes the Toronto to New York City run. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/3336/5313641895/">Diego Torres Silvestre</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
The Via Rail/Amtrak train "Maple Leaf" (shown here near Niagara Falls) makes the Toronto to New York City run. Photo: Diego Torres Silvestre, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Canada disrupts Al Qaeda-supported "major terror plot"

Canadian officials say they have disrupted a "major" terror plot involving two men in Montreal and Toronto who were planning to derail a VIA passenger train.

According to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the pair were working with support from Al Qaeda elements based in Iran. Sources in the US say the men were planning to attack a train traveling from Toronto to New York City.

This news comes at a time when concerns are rising about terrorism activity based in Canada.  Go to full article
Border patrol vehicles await the bus in Canton. Photo: David Sommerstein
Border patrol vehicles await the bus in Canton. Photo: David Sommerstein

Sequester means fewer agents along Canadian border

The union representing border patrol agents says it's being unfairly targeted for spending cuts under the sequester, and that there will be less of a law enforcement presence along the North Country's border with Canada.  Go to full article
Border Patrol vehicles await the bus in Canton.
Border Patrol vehicles await the bus in Canton.

Citizenship questions far from the border

Across the North Country, border patrol road checkpoints where agents stop cars and ask passengers their citizenship have become a part of daily life. Today we have a story about another step in the creeping influence of homeland security inside the border.

It's now become commonplace for federal agents to board buses and trains across Upstate New York and ask passengers for proof of citizenship. The checks are sweeping up some drugs and illegal immigrants, but also people who are here legally. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Immigration lawyer Hilary Fraser
Immigration lawyer Hilary Fraser

Immigration bureaucracy lands legal residents in detention

One wrinkle in the immigration picture has been particularly difficult for foreign students and professionals working in the U.S.

There are two agencies within Homeland Security that handle visas. The one that issues them is U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. It says a foreign national may reapply or change a visa status "in a timely manner" before its expiration date. The visa itself may take weeks or months to process. The U.S. Border Patrol however, only looks at the expiration date.

If a person's visa has expired, that person is subject to detention. Immigration lawyer Hilary Fraser of Ithaca has defended clients caught between these two interpretations of the law. She told David Sommerstein one was a Filipino national living in Watertown.  Go to full article

Canada stands by Mohawk check-in at border

Canada will continue to impound cars and impose fines on Mohawks who don't check in with customs officers in Cornwall, Ontario. Five vehicles have been seized in the last week. Canada's border agency resumed the controversial policy last Friday after a grace period. Akwesasne Mohawk leaders say tribal members are being punished for last summer's stand-off that closed the border crossing for six weeks. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Border closure frustrates Cornwall

The impasse at the border near Massena is almost three weeks old. The international crossing remains closed to almost all traffic. Neither Canada nor the Mohawks are showing any signs of giving an inch in their dispute over the arming of customs officers on Cornwall Island. The customs station is located on sovereign Mohawk territory. Across the St. Lawrence River in the city of Cornwall, people are getting fed up, mostly with their own federal government. David Sommerstein spoke with Bill Kingston, assistant news director at Cornwall radio station AM 1220.  Go to full article
This was all the public - and reporters - could see of the Mohawks' protest on Cornwall Island.
This was all the public - and reporters - could see of the Mohawks' protest on Cornwall Island.

Canada, Mohawks dig in heels at Cornwall border

The international bridge between Massena and Cornwall, Ontario has been closed for more than two days now. And the stand-off between Akwesasne Mohawks and the Canadian government continues. The Mohawks are peacefully protesting Canada's new policy of arming their customs officers. The policy was to have taken effect on Monday. But the officers closed the border crossing on Cornwall Island the night before, saying they didn't feel safe. As David Sommerstein reports, neither side appears ready to budge.

Editor's note: NCPR encourages people of all points of view to post comments on our news stories. However, we require some civility in the discussion, and reserve the right to remove any post for any reason. We have exercised that right on many comments in this thread. If you want to be heard, please don't be abusive.  Go to full article

Newspaper report: smuggling surges along US-Canada border

A newspaper in Ottawa is reporting this week that illegal cigarette smuggling across the US Canada border is booming. Despite hundreds of millions of dollars spent on Homeland Security, critics say illegal border crossings have returned to levels not seen since the 1990s. In January alone, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police seized over 72,000 cartons of cigarettes. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
Major General E. Gordon Stump, retired (Source:  CNGR)
Major General E. Gordon Stump, retired (Source: CNGR)

National Guard, reserves face future deployments

Since 9/11, hundreds of National Guard and Reserve soldiers from the North Country have been deployed to war zones overseas. A new group of soldiers just left for a year-long tour in Afghanistan. A controversial new report, delivered to Congress last week, argues that reservists will continue to face deployments well into the future, even after the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan wind down. Brian Mann spoke with E. Gordon Stump, a retired Major General with the U.S. Air Force. He's a member of the independent Commission on the National Guard and Reserves and a co-author of the study.  Go to full article

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