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News stories tagged with "honey"

Natural Selections: More About Bees

Bees need to be warm in order to fly. That's usually not a problem, since it takes millions of round trips to flowers to make a pound of honey. But should they fall idle long enough to cool down, bees fire up their wing muscles by shivering. Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley, with more about bees.  Go to full article
Honey bees at a Squeak Creek Apiaries hive
Honey bees at a Squeak Creek Apiaries hive

A busy summer for bees

It was two years ago that beekeepers began reporting losing 30 to 90 percent of their hives. The phenomenon has become known as Colony Collapse Disorder. Nationwide, beekeepers have lost 36 percent of their managed colonies this year, compared to 31 percent in 2007. "No bees, no crops," was a common phrase heard earlier this summer at a House Agriculture subcommittee meeting in Washington. Farmers and business owners say food prices could rise even more unless the mysterious decline in honey bees is solved. But that devastating illness, called CCD, hasn't affected North Country hives as much as other parts of the country, although it has made an appearance. Todd Moe spoke to a couple of beekeepers who are expecting a good honey harvest this year.  Go to full article

Guerrilla beekeepers to the rescue

Honeybees are dying. Sometimes entire hives are dying and scientists can't figure out exactly why. Some people are trying to help, and one of the ways they're helping is by becoming beekeepers. Rebecca Williams reports there are some beekeepers who actually raise bees in big cities.  Go to full article

Bee colony collapse mystery

Scientists are scrambling to find out why honey bee populations are collapsing. As Lester Graham reports, there are a lot of theories. Some of them are getting more attention than others.  Go to full article

Mysterious disappearing bees

Millions of honeybees across the country are dying mysteriously. Entire hives or colonies of bees are collapsing. Scientists say it's some new threat. They're scrambling to find answers. As Bob Allen reports, bees are crucial in pollinating billions of dollars worth of crops every spring.  Go to full article

Mark Berninghausen is North Country Public Radio

Mark Berninghausen, a beekeeper from Brasher Falls, explains how he "knocks on the door" of a hive without riling up the residents.  Go to full article

A Bee Keeper Struggles With Drought and Cold Weather

Brian Mann talks with Todd Hardie, whose Honey Gardens Apiaries keeps bee hives in the St. Lawrence and Lake Champlain valleys. Both regions are famous for their light honey, but have been challenged by drought and cold.  Go to full article

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