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News stories tagged with "hospice"

Prison hospital gate. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/atbaker/2948498050/">Adam Baker</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Prison hospital gate. Photo: Adam Baker, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

In final days, inmates care for inmates

Yesterday as part our Prison Time Media Project we heard the story of an inmate at Coxsackie prison, who fought to get home after he was diagnosed with terminal cancer.

It's a growing issue for America's huge prison system, as more inmates than ever are aging and dying behind bars.

Here in New York, hundreds of sick and dying inmates navigate the compassionate release system every year, but very few actually make it out of prison.

And for those inmates who die behind bars, prison officials offer them hospice care. As Natasha Haverty reports, those men and women are supported and comforted in their final days by fellow inmates.  Go to full article
Tedra and Ted Cobb
Tedra and Ted Cobb

Swimming a mile for hospice

Dozens of swimmers will gather in Hannawa Falls for the Third Annual "Swim a Mile for Hospice" event on Saturday. It's a non-competitive mile long swim to benefit the work hospice does in the St. Lawrence Valley. Last summer, swimmers young and old took to the water at Postwood Park Beach.

Todd Moe caught up with members of Team Cobb--a father-daughter swim team, Ted and Tedra Cobb-- before a practice swim in the pool at St. Lawrence University. Tedra's mother was a hospice patient a few years ago, and Tedra will be back in the water on Saturday.  Go to full article
The new hospice residential facility on Gotham St. in Watertown. Photo: Hospice of Jefferson County
The new hospice residential facility on Gotham St. in Watertown. Photo: Hospice of Jefferson County

New hospice residence to open doors soon in Watertown

Hospice groups provide care and comfort to people facing the end of their lives. Hospice of Jefferson County is about to take a big step forward in the kind of care it can offer dying patients -- a home.

Joanna Richards toured the new Watertown residence with CEO Stephen Lyman.  Go to full article
Tedra and Ted Cobb
Tedra and Ted Cobb

Swimming a mile for hospice

Dozens of swimmers will gather in Hannawa Falls for the annual "Swim a Mile for Hospice" event on Saturday. It's a non-competitive mile long swim to benefit the work hospice does in the St. Lawrence Valley. Last summer, 67 swimmers young and old took to the water at Postwood Park Beach. Todd Moe caught up with members of Team Cobb -- a father-daughter swim team -- just before a recent practice swim in the pool at St. Lawrence University. They swam last year and will be back in the water on Saturday.  Go to full article
Bill Gallagher (Photo provided)
Bill Gallagher (Photo provided)

The Hospice Path: Goodbye and what comes after

Most of us hate to talk or think about death. It may be the last taboo subject in America. But beginning last spring, Brian Mann asked one North Country family to do just that.

As part of a series called The Hospice Path, Brian documented the lives of Bill and Tommie Gallagher. Bill joined the High Peaks Hospice program after he was diagnosed with an untreatable lung ailment. He died last Monday at his home in Saranac Lake, surrounded by family and helped in his final hours by a hospice nurse.

But it turns out that Bill's death isn't the final step in the hospice process. As Brian learned, the program's nurses and counselors will now work with his family as they begin to grieve and say good-bye.  Go to full article
Bill and Tommy Gallagher (Photo: Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enteprprise)
Bill and Tommy Gallagher (Photo: Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enteprprise)

The Hospice Path: Fighting "compassion fatigue"

The last few months, we've been airing a special new series called the Hospice Path.

We've been profiling one family, the Gallaghers in Saranac Lake, who are working with the hospice program as Bill Gallagher nears the end of his life.
Bill suffers from a degenerative lung condition and doctors say he has less than a year to live.

This morning, Brian Mann looks at the other side of the relationship, talking with the hospice workers who help people across the North Country at the end of their lives.  Go to full article
Bill & Tomi Gallagher (Photo:  Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)
Bill & Tomi Gallagher (Photo: Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

Hospice Path: Dealing with depression

This morning we continue our on-going series called the Hospice Path. North Country Public Radio is looking in-depth at the way hospice and palliative care programs can help people at the end of their lives.

We've been profiling Bill Gallagher in Saranac Lake. He's 87 years old and his lungs are slowly failing. With the support of his wife Tomi, he's been able to remain at home with his family. Despite those successes, Bill has struggled at times with depression, loneliness and boredom.

As Brian Mann reports, hospice experts say those experiences are common for hospice patients nearing the end of their lives.  Go to full article
Shawn Galbreath, director of High Peaks Hospice
Shawn Galbreath, director of High Peaks Hospice

The Hospice Path: Talking honestly about death

Over the last couple of months, we've been airing an occasional series about hospice care in the North Country.

Hospice programs provide end-of-life care, everything from pain management to help with family crises.

We've been profiling one couple, Bill and Tommi Gallagher, who live in Saranac Lake and are taking part in hospice as Bill's health declines.

This morning, Brian Mann talks with Shawn Galbreath, the new director of High Peaks Hospice.

Galbreath took over the program this summer.

She says one of hospice's main goals is helping families have am ore realistic conversation about what happens at the end of life.  Go to full article
Bill and Tomi Gallagher (Photo:  Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)
Bill and Tomi Gallagher (Photo: Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

The Hospice Path: Helping the helpers

When a patient enters a hospice program at the end of their life, a lot of the focus is on their experience, their choices, and their preparations for death.

As part of our on-going series, called the Hospice Path, we've been profiling Bill Gallagher.

He began working with High Peaks Hospice after doctors told him that his lungs were weakening and couldn't be treated.

This morning, Brian Mann shifts the focus to Tomi Gallagher, Bill's wife. They've been married and caring for each other for nearly seven decades.

Tomi Gallagher says hospice is now offering her important help, while she and her husband navigate this difficult transition.  Go to full article
Zelda Foster (Source:  Columbia University)
Zelda Foster (Source: Columbia University)

The Hospice Path, Part Three: Remembering pioneer Zelda Foster

North Country Public Radio has begun an on-going series looking at the ways that hospice programs can help when someone is approaching the end of their life.

It turns out a social worker here in New York was one of the pioneers of hospice and end-of-life care. Zelda Foster passed away in 2006.

At that time, reporter Gregory Warner profiled a woman who spent forty years advocating for people's right to die with dignity.  Go to full article

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