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News stories tagged with "hospitals"

Photo: <a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/08/Newborn_Examination_1967.jpg">Nevit Dilmen</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Nevit Dilmen, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

NY now requires newborn screening

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) New York hospitals are now required to screen newborns for heart defects under a new law.

The measure, which took effect Monday, requires all birthing facilities to administer the test called pulse oximetry screening.  Go to full article

Feds urge more talks on NY Medicaid application

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) New York has revised its request for a $10 billion Medicaid adjustment, which would allow using that money to pay for related health care programs, after federal officials concluded capital investment and some other programs are ineligible.

The application was first filed 18 months ago, prompting Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the state health commissioner to publicly blame the delay for threatening financially distressed New York hospitals.  Go to full article
Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus are the most common pathogens in hospital-acquired infections. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/42636622@N07/6055667551/">Microbe WOrld</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus are the most common pathogens in hospital-acquired infections. Photo: Microbe WOrld, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Report: Hospital-acquired infections decline in NY

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) A report from the state Health Department says the number of infections acquired by patients while in New York hospitals continues to decline.

The sixth-annual report on hospital-acquired infections found that since 2007 the rate of central-line associated blood stream infections has fallen 53 percent and rates of surgical site infections fell by 16 percent.  Go to full article
Dr. John Rugge, founder od the Hudson Headwaters Health Network, is a vice co-chair of the North Country Health Systems Redesign Commission. Photo: Brian Mann
Dr. John Rugge, founder od the Hudson Headwaters Health Network, is a vice co-chair of the North Country Health Systems Redesign Commission. Photo: Brian Mann

Full work-up ordered for North Country health care

The interlocking puzzle of the health care system across the North Country will get a thorough going-over in the next three months or so.

The North Country Health Systems Redesign Commission, announced this week by state Health Commissioner Dr. Nariv Shah, has a big job: improve preventive, medical, behavioral and long-term care from Glens Falls to Plattsburgh to Watertown.  Go to full article
Canton-Potsdam Hospital CEO David Acker. Photo: Martha Foley
Canton-Potsdam Hospital CEO David Acker. Photo: Martha Foley

Why there will be fewer hospitals in the North Country

In the latest installment in our series of health care conversations, David Acker. Acker has been president and CEO of Canton Potsdam Hospital for six years.

The hospital has 94 beds, admits about 5,000 patients a year, treats 26,000 people a year at its emergency room, and employs 930 people.

The last two numbers, staff and ER visits, are trending up. And the hospital is soon to open a new urgent care center to meet the rising need for primary care.

Canton Potsdam Hospital is one of a series of smaller hospitals stringing east to west between Plattsburgh to Watertown.

Acker says it's a network that's at a tipping point. There's just not enough money to go around. And he says these smaller hospitals will soon have to collaborate and consolidate care, or they won't survive.

These hospitals now rely on affiliations with large teaching hospitals in Syracuse and Burlington Vermont. Acker says those relationships will become "more meaningful and deeper as time goes on."

So what do the little hospitals need from the bigger medical centers? Acker says a lot of it comes down to money.  Go to full article
Massena Memorial Hospital. Photo: p4hinc.com
Massena Memorial Hospital. Photo: p4hinc.com

Why keep Massena Memorial Hospital public?

A group campaigning to stop Massena Memorial Hospital from privatizing has collected more than 500 petition signatures. They're trying to convince town leaders to retain hospital ownership.

Because it's government-owned, Massena Memorial is one of a few hospitals in New York that currently pays into the state pension system. Hospital leaders say pension costs have been rising at an unsustainable rate, and they could save millions of dollars by changing the ownership structure.

Mark Kotzin is leading the charge against the change. He's spokesperson for the Civil Service Employees Association, which represents about 200 employees at the hospital.

Kotzin says government-ownership is better for the community than privatizing the facility.  Go to full article
Stephens Mundy is CEO of CVPH in Plattsburgh and executive vice president for Northern New York for Fletcher Allen Partners. Photo: CVPH
Stephens Mundy is CEO of CVPH in Plattsburgh and executive vice president for Northern New York for Fletcher Allen Partners. Photo: CVPH

Partnerships, budget cuts reshape North Country healthcare

Last month, North Country Public Radio launched an ongoing series where we're talking in-depth with some of the region's health care leaders.

This is a time of huge transition for the industry -- and huge pressure on rural hospitals, nursing homes, home-health programs and ambulance squads.

That's meant some big changes, including a decision last year by CVPH Hospital and the Elizabethtown Community Hospital to join an umbrella company headed by Fletcher Allen Hospital in Burlington, Vermont.

Stephens Mundy is CEO of CVPH and serves as executive vice president for Northern New York for the new organization called Fletcher Allen Partners. He sat down last week with Brian Mann.  Go to full article
Massena Memorial Hospital. Photo: p4hinc.com
Massena Memorial Hospital. Photo: p4hinc.com

Group fights Massena hospital privatization

Efforts to privatize Massena Memorial Hospital are facing opposition. The hospital is currently owned by the town of Massena. Hospital leaders want to privatize, in large part to save money on state pension costs.  Go to full article
EJ Noble Hospital's new CEO Marlinda LaValley, and new board chair Michael Burgess. Photo: Julie Grant
EJ Noble Hospital's new CEO Marlinda LaValley, and new board chair Michael Burgess. Photo: Julie Grant

EJ Noble Hospital: 'We're open for business'

E.J. Noble Hospital in Gouverneur has had a tough year. Last fall, the State Department of Health forced it to close down, after finding numerous safety violations in the hospital lab.

Most of the problems have been corrected. The hospital has new management and a new board of directors. Now it needs the patients to return.  Go to full article
Photo: Brian Mann
Photo: Brian Mann

Adk Health looks to cut Lake Placid Hospital

There was another sign this week of the growing financial crunch faced by many hospitals in the North Country. Adirondack Health is looking at moving, shutting down or cutting the hours of the emergency room at its Lake Placid hospital.  Go to full article

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