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News stories tagged with "housing"

Lynee Erlenbach and her sisters show off latch-hook rugs they made.
Lynee Erlenbach and her sisters show off latch-hook rugs they made.

Homelessness: Surviving the School Shuffle

In the North Country, homelessness often means something different than sleeping on a park bench or under a bridge. A family who can't afford a home may move in with relatives, then a month later into a motel room, then into a low-rent apartment, and on and on. Each time the family moves, the children have to get used to new surroundings, new people, and new routines. And in many cases, they have to go to a new school. Preliminary studies show up to a third of the students in many districts don't end the academic year in the same school they started. On the second day of our series, Close to Homeless, we look at how transiency affects kids' education and the schools they attend. David Sommerstein has our story.  Go to full article
Laura Davenport and Cassie
Laura Davenport and Cassie

Homelessness: Breaking the Cycle of Transiency

In part one of our series 'Close to Homeless', David Sommerstein reports on a family in Dickinson Center in Franklin County who have experienced the most persistent kind of rural homelessness: chronic transiency.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Indoor pollution

Breathe that clean country air--outdoors. In your house the mothballs give off carcinogens, the carpets harbor ancient DDT residue, and don't even think about what's under the sink. Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley share the bad news about toxic households.  Go to full article

Housing Privatization Protects Fort Drum's Future

Last week, the Army announced California-based housing developer, Actus Lend Lease, won a contract to build 1200 new homes around Fort Drum for the base's soldiers and their families. The construction is expected to cost more than $300 million over ten years. Decisions the company makes will affect the base itself, as well as towns in Jefferson, Lewis, and St. Lawrence Counties, where many soldier families live. The plan is a part of a massive nationwide project to privatize military housing, called the Residential Communities Initiative, or RCI. David Sommerstein spoke with John Deans, chairman of the Fort Drum Regional Liaison Organization, about the privatization plan. Deans has toured bases around the country to learn more about RCI. He says on many bases, soldiers live in aging homes.  Go to full article
Affordable housing, pt.3
Affordable housing, pt.3

Adirondack Vacation Homes Displace Year-round Residents

There's a housing boom underway in the Adirondacks - but most of the new homes are going to vacationers or seasonal residents. Visitors are also buying up hundreds of homes and camps once owned by locals. As Brian Mann reports, some villagers worry that the tight real estate market will hurt local economies - and even damage the sense of community.  Go to full article
Affordable housing, pt. 2
Affordable housing, pt. 2

Lumber Prices Spike for North Country Home Builders

Over the last decade, housing costs in the Adirondacks have grown by nearly a third. The cost of building or remodeling a home spiked again this summer, as the price of plywood and oriented strand board more than doubled. The increase was triggered in part by the military's purchase of massive amounts of construction materials in Iraq. As Brian Mann reports, the tight market is adding thousands of dollars to the cost of a new home.  Go to full article
Affordable Housing Series: Part I
Affordable Housing Series: Part I

Seasonal Buyers Price Locals Out of New Housing Market

Today, we begin an occasional series of reports on housing in the North Country. We'll examine some of the issues people face when looking for safe, affordable places to live. Surveys show that many local families struggle to find decent homes and apartments at a price they can afford. For a first look at the broad range of concerns, Brian Mann spoke with John Mills, provost at Paul Smiths College and part of a Regional Housing Task Force organized last year.  Go to full article

HomeShare Vermont Expands Into Central Vermont

A program that finds housemates for elderly or disabled people so they can stay in their homes has expanded into central Vermont. Jody Tosti has more.  Go to full article

St. Lawrence Housing Council Shares Budget Uncertainty

Directors of non-profit groups that rely on grants to run their programs get a little nervous around budget time each year. They're at the bottom of a pipeline that filters money down through federal and state grants. As Jody Tosti reports, It's a precarious place to be sometimes, especially when so many agencies are vying for money from the same pot.  Go to full article
Builder Eric Schulze.
Builder Eric Schulze.

An Energy Saving Habitat

Tomorrow the affordable housing group Habitat For Humanity of Raquette Valley holds a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 3pm in Rensselaer Falls in St. Lawrence County. The house is a first for the Habitat chapter because in addition to being affordable, it?s also energy efficient. Builders designed a home that uses 30% less energy than a conventional one. The organizers want the project to be a template for building more low-cost, energy-efficient housing. David Sommerstein visited the construction site last winter. He spoke with the designer and volunteers on the project and has this audio montage.

Call Community Energy Services at (315)379-9466 for more information about the energy efficient model.  Go to full article

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