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News stories tagged with "housing"

Bill curtailing Adirondack Park Agency enforcement power fails in Assembly

An effort by North Country lawmakers to limit the enforcement power of the Adirondack Park Agency failed to pass the state Assembly last week. The bill which passed in the Senate would have placed a ten-year statute of limitations on environmental and zoning violations.

As Brian Mann reports, supporters of the change say they'll bring it back next session.  Go to full article

Costs and benefits of new lead paint laws

New regulations designed to eliminate childhood lead poisoning go into effect on April 22. The change brings strict new requirements for building contractors, property owners, renovators and a host of others who work with lead paint. While health advocates call the regulations long overdue, some contractors say the cost to comply is way too high. As part of a collaboration with Northeast stations, New Hampshire Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports.  Go to full article

Essex farmer Lewis wins another court fight against Adirondack Park Agency

Essex County farmer Salim "Sandy" Lewis won another round in court yesterday in his battle with the Adirondack Park Agency. According to the New York Times, a state judge has ordered the APA to pay all of Lewis's legal fees and expenses following a lengthy court fight. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
Adirondack Council's ties to APA scrutinized
Adirondack Council's ties to APA scrutinized

Critics, lawsuit claim Adirondack Council sways APA decisions unfairly

For years, critics have claimed that a prominent environmental group called the Adirondack Council holds too much sway over decisions made by the Adirondack Park Agency. Nearly half of the public members now sitting on the Park Agency commission are former members of the Council's board of directors. State officials say safeguards are in place, preventing any outside group from influencing the APA's deliberations unfairly. But a lawsuit filed in November claims that Park Agency worked secretly with the Council, targeting a real estate developer in Clinton County. Brian Man has our special report.  Go to full article

A house made of straw

The big bad wolf gave straw houses a pretty bad reputation. But it turns out straw bale houses are incredibly strong and energy efficient. The century-old building material is making a comeback as an eco-friendly choice for modern home construction. And these homeowners aren't afraid of a little wind. One woman is even building a straw bale house in the sometimes cold, blustery climate of the east. Joyce Kryszak tells us her story.  Go to full article

With legal battle over, farmer seeks compensation for legal fees

A farmer in Essex County wants more than $200,000 in legal fees from the Adirondack Park Agency, following a lengthy court battle. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article

Big Tupper resort project heads back to APA

A lengthy and secretive attempt to resolve concerns about the impacts of a massive Tupper Lake resort project has come to an end with no agreement between the developer and the project's biggest critics. Michael Foxman, lead developer of the Adirondack Club and Resort, has reportedly ended closed-door mediation sessions with environmental groups and neighbors to the project. The mediation began in April of 2008 but only a handful of sessions took place. As Chris Knight reports, the project is now headed back to the Adirondack Park Agency for an adjudicatory hearing process that could be just as lengthy  Go to full article

APA approves Brandreth Lake housing plan

A key Adirondack Park Agency committee has approved plans for a large scale residential development on a remote Adirondack lake. The APA's Regulatory Programs Committee signed off yesterday on the Brandreth Lake Association's plan to build 44 homes on more than 400 acres at the northern end of the lake, located in Hamilton County. Environmental groups were divided over the project. Chris Knight reports.  Go to full article

Bringing back a neighborhood "on the verge" in Ogdensburg

The city of Ogdensburg is getting $650,000 to improve some run-down residential properties. The federal and state money will go to programs operating under the umbrella of what's called "neighborhood stabilization." In Ogdensburg, nine homes will be fixed up. And they're already owned by the city, most acquired through tax foreclosure. Jonathan Brown has more.  Go to full article

Home foreclosure worries grow in North Country

The North Country has managed to dodge the worst parts of the home-mortgage crisis that has devastated the country's economy. Foreclosures in this region haven't spiked as they have in other parts of the country. But some real estate experts say the souring economy and the growing number of lay-offs has begun to hit more homeowners. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

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