Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "hrbrrd"

Congklingville Dam (Photo: HRBRRD)
Congklingville Dam (Photo: HRBRRD)

North Country dam-reservoir authority angers commmunities with $3 million loan

The state authority that operates dams and reservoirs across the North Country voted this week to bail itself out with an internal loan worth more than $3 million.

The Hudson River-Black River Regulating District will shift the money from the region around Watertown and the Black River drainage to pay for operations in the Adirondacks and around the Great Sacandaga Reservoir.

The move has sparked anger from some North Country politicians, who say their communities are being forced to subsidize the state's operations in other parts of the state.

Brian Mann spoke with 8 O'clock Hour host Martha Foley to sort through the controversy.  Go to full article

Head of North Country's embattled dam and reservoir system steps down

The head of one of the most embattled state organizations in the North Country has stepped down. Glenn LaFave, who ran the Hudson River Black River Regulating District, left the organization last Wednesday after four years on the job.

As Brian Mann reports, he departs as the District's future is in doubt because of a debt crisis and a series of court challenges.  Go to full article
Conklingville Dam on Great Sacandaga Reservoir (Source: HRBRRD)
Conklingville Dam on Great Sacandaga Reservoir (Source: HRBRRD)

State authority that runs North Country dams, reservoirs running out of money

The state-run authority that manages many of the North Country's dams and reservoirs is running out of cash. Officials with the Hudson River-Black River Regulating District announced last week that they will lay off twelve employees at the end of the month.

The organization lost most of its revenue in 2008 because of a court decision and is still struggling to find ways to pay for its operations. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Judge Blocks Adirondack Mansion Near Old Forge

A state judge in Herkimer County says a mansion in the western Adirondacks will have to be torn down. In a ruling issued Wednesday, Judge Michael Dailey found that Timothy Noonan's 19,000 square foot house violated an Adirondack Park Agency permit. The permit required that the new house, built on the Fulton Chain of lakes near Inlet, be one-sixth that size. In a press release, attorney general Eliot Spitzer described the case as a "common sense enforcement action." He said that efforts to negotiate a settlement were rebuffed by Noonan, a prominent businessman who owns the Water Safari theme park in Old Forge. Noonan was appointed by Governor Pataki to sit on the Hudson River-Black River Regulating District board of directors, but stepped down earlier this year. He couldn't be reached for comment. Brian Mann spoke about the ruling with Park Agency spokesman Keith McKeever.  Go to full article
APA executive director Dick LeFebvre
APA executive director Dick LeFebvre

Critic Says New APA Chief Emailed Racy Photo

The Adirondack Park Agency's new executive director has been accused of transmitting a photograph of partially nude women to one of his state employees. Dick LeFebvre took over at the APA in August, following a computer pornography scandal that forced executive director Dan Fitts to resign. LeFebvre had been serving as executive director of the Hudson River-Black River Regulating District. The state authority manages dams and reservoirs across the north country. A former employee has filed a written complaint claiming that LeFebvre emailed an improper photo and made inappropriate jokes at a Regulating District office party. As Brian Mann reports, Regulating District officials say they'll investigate the allegation.  Go to full article

Sacandaga Beach Permits Reconsidered

The agency that operates many of the north country's dams and reservoirs is backing away from a plan to change shoreline access rules on Great Sacandaga Lake. The Hudson River-Black River Regulating District had proposed forcing some property owners to give up their beach access permits when they sell their homes. In the past, those permits transferred with the property. As Brian Mann reports, the move to change the permit rule angered some local people.  Go to full article

Manure Spill Contaminates Black River

A massive sewage spill from a dairy farm near Lowville, on the Black River, forced Watertown to shut off its main water supply yesterday afternoon. The city is operating on reserves of stored water. State officials have increased the flow of water from the Stillwater Reservoir, hoping to flush the liquid manure out into Lake Ontario. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
Great Sacandaga Lake
Great Sacandaga Lake

On Great Sacandaga Lake, A Feud Over Beach Rights

The Hudson River Black River Regulating District faces new criticism over management of the state-owned shoreline at Great Sacandaga Lake. More than 120 miles of public beach is leased each year by the authority to thousands of property owners. Most of the permit-holders own land adjacent to the reservoir. But roughly 1800 so-called "back lot" permits are held by people who own homes within a mile of the shore. State officials now say some of those permits won't be allowed to transfer when properties are sold to new owners. Instead, the permits will be turned over to "front lot" homeowners who live next to the lake. As Brian Mann reports, critics say the policy is unfair and could cost them tens of thousands of dollars.  Go to full article
Great Sacandaga Lake
Great Sacandaga Lake

River & Reservoir Agency Faces More Turmoil, Criticism

A senior official with the Hudson River Black River Regulating District has quit and is leveling criticism at the agency's management. The resignation is the latest turmoil for the agency that manages dams and reservoirs across the north country. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
Great Sacandaga, a HRBRRD reservoir
Great Sacandaga, a HRBRRD reservoir

River Agency May Close Albany Office

The Hudson River Black River Regulating District may be forced to close its Albany office and cut staff. Regulating District officials say their office in Watertown will remain open. The state authority that controls north country dams and reservoirs faces a growing budget shortfall. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

1-10 of 12  next 2 »  last »