Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "hunting"

Deer Disease Spreads to Wild

State officials said yesterday a wild deer in Oneida County has preliminarily tested positive for chronic wasting disease. It's the first time the fatal sickness has turned up in the wild in New York. The DEC is putting in place emergency containment measures by the end of the week. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

First Wild Deer Tests Negative for Chronic Wasting Disease

State conservation officials say initial samples of wild deer in Oneida County showed no signs of chronic wasting disease. Five deer on two farms tested positive for the fatal neurological illness earlier this month. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

First Wild Deer Tests Negative for Chronic Wasting Disease

State conservation officials say initial samples of wild deer in Oneida County showed no signs of chronic wasting disease. Five deer on two farms tested positive for the fatal neurological illness earlier this month. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Ortloff: Disease May Mean Permanent Ban On Deer Feeding

Assemblyman Chris Ortloff, from Plattsburgh, will take part in a new Republican task force designed to promote hunting and fishing. The move comes as the number of hunters in New York state continues to dwindle. Speaking this week with Brian Mann, Ortloff says the discovery of Chronic Wasting Disease in deer herds in Oneida County poses a major new threat to sportsmen and to groups that feed white tail deer.  Go to full article

Fight Against Deer Disease Expands To North Country

State scientists will begin testing wild deer in Hamilton county, looking for cases of chronic wasting disease. Environment officials say a captive herd that operated in Arietta in the mid-90s may have been the source of infection that spread to deer in Oneida county. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
An elk with CWD.  Photo by Dr. Beth Williams, University of Wyoming, courtesy of CWD Alliance.
An elk with CWD. Photo by Dr. Beth Williams, University of Wyoming, courtesy of CWD Alliance.

Officials Fight Odds to Stop Chronic Wasting Disease

State officials are trying to prevent the spread of chronic wasting disease, or CWD, a fatal neurological disorder in deer and elk. It's thought to be transmitted through the animals' brain and spinal cord tissue. But there are no known links to illness in humans. Two farm-raised deer in Oneida County have tested positive for the disease. It's the first time CWD's been found east of Illinois. One of the deer was served at a sportsmens' dinner in the town of Verona. Officials are scrambling to keep the disease from spreading among New York's one million wild white-tailed deer. But as David Sommerstein reports, their cause may be an uphill battle.  Go to full article

CWD - Lessons from Wisconsin

People in Wisconsin have lived with concerns about chronic wasting disease since the first case surfaced there over two years ago. It was found in a wild deer. So far, some 460 animals have tested positive for the disease. People still hunt...and they still eat wild and domestic venison. Gil Halsted is a reporter for Wisconsin Public Radio. He's followed the story since that first case. He spoke with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

Chronic Wasting Disease Hits Oneida County

Yesterday state officials confirmed the first case of chronic wasting disease in New York. It was found in a domesticated white-tailed deer in Oneida County. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Deer harvest down in New York state (NCPR file photo)
Deer harvest down in New York state (NCPR file photo)

Deer Season Declines Dramatically, Second Straight Year

Hunters killed far fewer white-tail deer during the fall season. A report issued yesterday by New York state shows the total harvest dropping by roughly 100,000 deer over the last two years. As Brian Mann reports, state biologists say the dramatic change reflects a shrinking herd.  Go to full article
APA Chairman Ross Whaley Called For Further Review
APA Chairman Ross Whaley Called For Further Review

Special Report: APA Staff Divided On Big Tupper Great Camps

The Adirondack Park Agency is reviewing a proposed resort development in Tupper Lake that would mean construction of more than 800 vacation homes and condos. A cornerstone of the project are the 25 "great camp" sized lots that would spread over roughly two thousand acres. Environmentalists and some locals say the great camp subdivision could damage the forest and disrupt wildlife habitat. An APA report issued last month played down those concerns. But an investigation by North Country Public Radio has found that members of the Park Agency's own review team were deeply troubled by the project. As Brian Mann reports, their recommendations were over-ruled by the APA's executive team and their environmental concerns were never made public.  Go to full article

« first  « previous 10  48-104 of 80  next -24 »  last »