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News stories tagged with "hydro-quebec"

The wild Rupert River in the months before its diversion. Photo: Brian Mann
The wild Rupert River in the months before its diversion. Photo: Brian Mann

A fading river, a wild wolf

North Country Public Radio has had a long love-affair with wolves.

In 2007, our Adirondack bureau chief Brian Mann was traveling in northern Quebec, studying the environmental and cultural impacts of hydro development.

He was paddling with Phil Royce from the outdoor program at St. Lawrence University.  Go to full article
Rupert River diversion was a massive industrial project rooted in Quebec's wilderness (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Rupert River diversion was a massive industrial project rooted in Quebec's wilderness (Photo: Brian Mann)

As Northeast looks to Hydro Quebec for power, thorny environmental questions remain

Northeast states are increasingly looking to Canada to meet a growing demand for low cost hydro electricity from renewable sources.

But the energy imports are stirring controversy. In northern New Hampshire, local activists are fighting a power line that would send the electricity south. And questions are being raised about whether big hydro is really green.

As part of a collaboration of Northeast stations John Dillon of Vermont Public Radio reports.

Northeast environmental reporting is made possible, in part, by a grant from United Technologies. Northeast environmental coverage is part of NPR's Local News Initiative.  Go to full article
The Rupert River before it was diverted by Hydro Quebec
The Rupert River before it was diverted by Hydro Quebec

Story 2.0: Power for the US, a changed river for the Cree

As we've been hearing in John Dillon's report, there is a debate raging over the future of Hydro Quebec's power projects and their impact on the environment.

Brian Mann has traveled repeatedly to Cree Crounty in northern Quebec, talking with local leaders about the way industrial power projects are changing their villages and the landscape.

This morning as part of our series Story 2.0, we'll revisit his report from 2007.  Go to full article
The wild Rupert River will soon be altered radically.
The wild Rupert River will soon be altered radically.

On a wild Quebec river, wolves, caribou and the encroachment of industry

Last November, Brian Mann reported on plans to dam and divert the massive Rupert River in northern Quebec. The project, developed by the provincial utility, Hydro-Quebec, will provide hydroelectricity to consumers in New York and Vermont. His story was recognized with an Edward R. Murrow Award. Last week, Brian returned to paddle the Rupert again. He made the trip as part of a documentary project called "Encounters." Here's his reporter's notebook.  Go to full article

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