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News stories tagged with "hydrofracking"

Fracking wastewater after treatment at temporary, privately owned facility in Pennsylvania. Photo: Matt Richmond/WSKG
Fracking wastewater after treatment at temporary, privately owned facility in Pennsylvania. Photo: Matt Richmond/WSKG

How would New York deal with hydrofracking wastewater?

About four million gallons of water goes into a typical Marcellus Shale well during the fracking process. As much as 20 percent of what went in comes back out right away. That's what's known as flowback water.

Over the life of a producing well, more than a million gallons comes out, and after the initial flowback the rest is known as produced water.  Go to full article
Protestors at an Albany anti-fracking demonstration in August, 2012. Photo: Brian Mann
Protestors at an Albany anti-fracking demonstration in August, 2012. Photo: Brian Mann

Why Gov. Cuomo is being dubbed "Hamlet on the Shale"

Gov. Andrew Cuomo faces a tough choice as he continues to ponder the decision on whether to allow hydraulic fracturing in New York. With both sides dug in, there's no easy way to win for the governor.  Go to full article
The pipeline raises concerns for some Vermonters, who attended a public meeting in Hinesburg last month. Photo: Sarah Harris
The pipeline raises concerns for some Vermonters, who attended a public meeting in Hinesburg last month. Photo: Sarah Harris

Proposed VT-NY natural gas pipeline stirs debate

The natural gas boom is fueling construction and development, and cutting energy prices in some areas. But there's often a dark cloud around the silver lining. A pipeline proposed to bring natural gas through Vermont to the International Paper Mill in Ticonderoga means good news for the mill, but some Vermonters aren't happy about the route, or possible environmental consequences.  Go to full article
Photo: Emma Jacobs
Photo: Emma Jacobs

New York delays fracking decision again

A February deadline on New York's process to allow hydro fracking will be missed, with Governor Cuomo's Health Commissioner now saying he needs more time to complete an on going health study.  Go to full article
A tanker trucks transports water for hydrofracking operations in Susquehanna County, Pa. In his letter, Dr. Nirav Shah says some other states didn't seriously study health concerns before allowing hydrofracking. Photo: Marie Cusick
A tanker trucks transports water for hydrofracking operations in Susquehanna County, Pa. In his letter, Dr. Nirav Shah says some other states didn't seriously study health concerns before allowing hydrofracking. Photo: Marie Cusick

NYS fracking health study won't make its deadline

It looks like the decision on whether to allow large-scale hydraulic fracturing in New York state will probably be delayed. In a letter this afternoon, State Health Commissioner Nirav Shah wrote his department needs more time to investigate fracking's potential health impacts. Shah said that's because the issues they're considering are very complex.  Go to full article
At Monday's budget hearing, DEC Commissioner Joe Martens was grilled by legislators as a crowd of fracking opponents cheered and hissed. Photo: Matt Ryan for Innovation Trail
At Monday's budget hearing, DEC Commissioner Joe Martens was grilled by legislators as a crowd of fracking opponents cheered and hissed. Photo: Matt Ryan for Innovation Trail

DEC may miss fracking rules deadline

New York's Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens suggested Monday that the state may miss a Feb. 27 deadline to complete its proposed fracking regulations. And that could stall a decision on gas drilling for months.

At a budget hearing Martens told legislators that there's no timetable for his agency's environmental review of fracking, known as the Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement (SGEIS). He says the DEC is still waiting for the Department of Health to finalize its public health review.  Go to full article
Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr
Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr

NYS DEC cuts complicate fracking picture

Proponents and opponents of hydrofracking in New York state read Gov. Andrew Cuomo's budget closely for clues about fracking's future in the state.

They didn't see much. A decision on whether fracking will be allowed is expected after a health study is complete in February.

The agency overseeing the review, and in charge of permitting should fracking get the go-ahead, is New York's Department of Environmental Conservation. And it's in for a cut of five and a half percent in Cuomo's new budget.  Go to full article
Where drillers want to use hydrofracking in New York: pending well permit applications for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Image: Innovation Trail
Where drillers want to use hydrofracking in New York: pending well permit applications for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Image: Innovation Trail

Fracking opponents prep for comments fight

New York's Department of Environmental Conservation released a draft set of regulations for hydraulic fracturing in November. Those proposed rules are open for public comment until Jan. 11, 2013.

Fracking opponents are preparing to make the most of the opportunity.  Go to full article
Hydrofracking drillpad. Photo: Matt Richmond
Hydrofracking drillpad. Photo: Matt Richmond

Neither side happy with draft fracking rules

In conversation with public radio Wednesday, Gov. Andrew offered the first clues on what's in the health study on hydraulic fracturing that his health commissioner and three outside experts are currently reviewing.

"They're looking at the experiences of other states in the country where this has been done, reports of possible health consequences," said Cuomo. "They will then help us make a determination whether there's a true health risk or not."

New York's Department of Environmental Conservation opened a new public comment period on rules for hydrofracking yesterday. It's working under an extended deadline, pending the review of health experts. Under the new timeline, the Cuomo Administration is headed toward a decision by the end of February.

New York first put hydrofracking on hold in 2008. Since then, the state's environmental regulators have been crafting regulations to oversee the controversial drilling practice. The DEC released the latest draft of those rules in November. Now, neither side in the hydro fracking debate is satisfied.  Go to full article
A tanker trucks transports water for hydrofracking operations in Susquehanna County, Pa. Photo: Marie Cusick
A tanker trucks transports water for hydrofracking operations in Susquehanna County, Pa. Photo: Marie Cusick

NY water regulations raise concerns about fracking

New York's Department of Environmental Conservation appears to be nearing the end of its four-year hydrofracking review. If the DEC gives an OK to the controversial drilling technique, final regulations are expected in early 2013.

The DEC recently released regulations that would cover water use by the natural gas industry. And advocates of strict protections for freshwater aren't impressed.  Go to full article

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