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News stories tagged with "hydrofracking"

Weeks after its founding, the Shale Resources and Society Institute (SRSI) released a study that hydrofracking opponents called flawed and biased toward the natural gas industry. Above, a hydrofracked well and drilling pad in Pennsylvania. Photo: Matt Richmond
Weeks after its founding, the Shale Resources and Society Institute (SRSI) released a study that hydrofracking opponents called flawed and biased toward the natural gas industry. Above, a hydrofracked well and drilling pad in Pennsylvania. Photo: Matt Richmond

Controversy simmers over SUNY shale institute

The founders of the new Shale Resources and Society Institute at SUNY Buffalo say its purpose is to act as an information hub on hydrofracking. But only a month after opening its doors, the new institute released a controversial study fracking opponents called flawed and biased in favor of the natural gas industry.

The study was written before the official launch of SRSI and was released under its banner without significant new changes from anyone working at SUNY Buffalo. While the report's authors admit a handful of small errors, they stand behind it and SUNY Buffalo administrators insist the institute was fulfilling its pledge to act as an information hub on fracking.

But the episode raises questions about how objective fracking research can be, even in academia.  Go to full article
A tanker trucks transports water for hydro fracking operations in Susquehanna County, Pa. Photo: Marie Cusick
A tanker trucks transports water for hydro fracking operations in Susquehanna County, Pa. Photo: Marie Cusick

Towns prep for heavy fracking truck traffic

Last summer, an anti-fracking group leaked a state transportation department document estimating the financial impact on New York's roads if hydro fracking for natural gas extraction goes ahead. The total expected was $200 to $400 million annually.

As the Innovation Trail's Ryan Delaney reports, many local governments have been working to make sure drilling companies will be accountable.  Go to full article
Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr
Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr

Fracking supporters, foes prepare legal next steps

New York State is poised to issue its plans for hydrofracking. The decision could come any time after Labor Day. But there's no guarantee the controversy will die down, and both opponents and supporters are exploring their legal options.  Go to full article
Protestors in Albany urge Gov. Cuomo to reject hydrofracking development. Photo: Brian Mann
Protestors in Albany urge Gov. Cuomo to reject hydrofracking development. Photo: Brian Mann

Protestors, industry pressure Cuomo on gas fracking

Hundreds of people joined a protest Monday on the bank of the Hudson River in Albany. They're hoping to convince Governor Andrew Cuomo to reject plans for hydraulic fracturing in New York. Companies hope to use the controversial drilling method to extract natural gas from deposits that lie deep underground.

Cuomo is expected to decide any day now whether to give the industry the green light, and activists and lobbyists are scrambling to influence the governor's final plan and to shape how his decision is viewed by the public.  Go to full article
<em>Under the Surface</em> by Tom Wilber, book cover (detail)
Under the Surface by Tom Wilber, book cover (detail)

Journalist bores into frack debate

New York first started seeing large-scale hydraulic fracturing in 2008. And Binghamton-area journalist Tom Wilber says when a group of farmers in his area leased their land for $110 million to an energy company, it was a huge story. It was just so much money.

Wilber has covered business and the environment in that area for twenty years. He was only a short drive from Pennsylvania, so he started looking across the border to find out more about this new gas drilling technique. Soon after, the gas well of a woman in Dimock, Pennsylvania who'd leased her land for fracking blew up. People started complaining that their water wells were being destroyed. Wilber says it was the turning point, when fracking went from boom to bust, at least for some people.

Wilber's new book, Under the Surface: Fracking, Fortunes and the Fate of the Marcellus Shale, deals with hydrofracking in New York. He spoke with Julie Grant about how that big land sale by farmers back in 2008 helped start the fracturing regulation debate in New York.  Go to full article
Photo: The Innovation Trail via innovationtrail.org
Photo: The Innovation Trail via innovationtrail.org

Pro-, anti-fracking activists spar with ads, await decision

Groups for and against hydraulic fracturing are gearing up for an announcement by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's environmental officials on whether the natural gas drilling process will be permitted in New York on a limited basis. But the groups, who are running ads, may have to wait a little longer.  Go to full article
Photo: Emma Jacobs
Photo: Emma Jacobs

New study finds risks in dealing with wastewater from hydrofracking

A new study says there are shortfalls in dealing with the massive amounts of contaminated water created through hydraulic fracturing.

The study by Stony Brook University finds the highest risk of flowback water contaminating water supplies occurs during the disposal process.  Go to full article
The Buffalo premiere of <i>Truthland</i>. Photo: Daniel Robison, Innovation Trail
The Buffalo premiere of Truthland. Photo: Daniel Robison, Innovation Trail

"Truthland" ignites fracking debate

A recent poll conducted by Quinnipiac University poll shows New York residents are evenly split on the issue of hydrofracking. The survey comes hard on the heels of a new pro-fracking public relations effort in upstate communities.

Last week, Buffalo was the stage for a screening of "Truthland," a film financed by the Independent Petroleum Association of America. As Daniel Robison reports, the event highlighted how starkly polarizing the topic can be for the public.  Go to full article
Volunteer Kathy Cronin stands in Binghamton's Pierce Creek after collecting baseline data on the stream. Photo: Matt Richmond/WSKG
Volunteer Kathy Cronin stands in Binghamton's Pierce Creek after collecting baseline data on the stream. Photo: Matt Richmond/WSKG

Water monitors prepare for fracking in New York

High-volume hydraulic fracturing has not come to Pierce Creek in the City of Binghamton. During the past four years, the Department of Environmental Conservation, or NYSDEC, has been conducting an environmental review of fracking. New York has more than 70,000 miles of rivers and streams running through it and opponents of hydrofracking say the controversial practice poses a risk to the state's waterways.  Go to full article
The Windsor Town Board took public commentson a resolution in favor of the DEC's authority over fracking. Photo: Matt Richmond/WSKG via Innovation Trail
The Windsor Town Board took public commentson a resolution in favor of the DEC's authority over fracking. Photo: Matt Richmond/WSKG via Innovation Trail

Pro and anti fracking laws duel in Southern Tier

The debate over hydraulic fracturing in New York State is growing heated in Southern Tier towns. And it's getting more complicated as localities wait for the state to issue its proposed regulations for hydrofracking. Many of the town boards there have passed resolutions supporting state control over gas drilling regulation. As The Innovation Trail's Matt Richmond reports, supporters are using the resolutions as a way to stem the flow of local drilling bans.  Go to full article

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