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News stories tagged with "hydrology"

Photo: <a href="ww.flickr.com/photos/90891744@N00/2313038401/">GP(MPK)</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: GP(MPK), Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Cryoseisms and other sounds of ice

One of the features of a hard winter can be loud spooky booming noises. These may be cryoseisms or "icequakes," caused when masses of ice expand and contract until they reach a breaking point. The sound signals the release of large amounts of energy.

Lake ice can also make alarming noises; some expert skaters can accurately estimate the thickness of the ice from the pitch of the noise. Ice expansion within trees and within homes can also add to winter jitters. Martha Foley and Curt Stager listen to the winter.  Go to full article
A degassing jet now helps keep Lake Nyos in Cameroon from exploding again. Photo: <a href="http://mhalb.pagesperso-orange.fr/nyos/">Degassing Nyos</a>
A degassing jet now helps keep Lake Nyos in Cameroon from exploding again. Photo: Degassing Nyos

Natural Selections: Exploding lake

When local legend in Africa spoke of an exploding lake, western researchers scoffed. They were wrong--Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about the exploding lake, Lake Nyos.  Go to full article
Tsunami warning
Tsunami warning

Natural Selections: What Makes Waves?

The average ocean wave travels about 35 mph, but waves created by earthquake can travel as fast as 400 mph across open ocean, and only show on the surface when the water shallows. Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley talk about making waves.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Waves

While we don't have as many different names for waves as eskimos have for snow, there are different kinds. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about how waves form in water, and what effects they can have.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Dowsing for Water

Dr. Curt Stager discusses the practice of using a divining rod to find water. Some people seem to be able to do it. So, is it for real, or just an old wives tale? The answer may lie somewhere in between.  Go to full article

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