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News stories tagged with "idle-no-more"

Photo: David Sommerstein
Photo: David Sommerstein

Being indigenous in Canada, through hip hop's lens

A new exhibit fusing hip hop and native culture has become somewhat of an art sensation in Canada. "Beat Nation: Hip Hop as Indigenous Culture" features more than two dozen artists offering their takes on what it means to be indigenous today.

They use beats, graffiti, street smarts, humor, and politics to challenge stereotypes. After very successful runs in Ottawa, Vancouver, and Toronto, "Beat Nation" is at the Museé d'art contemporain in Montreal through January 5, 2014.

As David Sommerstein reports, the exhibit coincides with the growth of Idle No More, the indigenous political movement in Canada.  Go to full article
A family at last Saturday's Idle No More march over the Cornwall bridge.  Photo by David Sommerstein.
A family at last Saturday's Idle No More march over the Cornwall bridge. Photo by David Sommerstein.

Big expectations for "Idle No More" meeting in Canada

First Nations chiefs are meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper in Ottawa today. The meeting is a response to months of protests by a grassroots aboriginal group called Idle No More.

The group is demanding the government address issues such as poverty, land claims, and profits from natural resources.

As Karen Kelly reports from Ottawa, it may be difficult for today's meeting to soothe decades of discontent.  Go to full article

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