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News stories tagged with "inmate"

State Senator Betty Little (R-Queensbury)
State Senator Betty Little (R-Queensbury)

Judge's inmate tally decision to shake up North Country legislative districts

A state Supreme Court judge issued a ruling late Friday that could dramatically reshape North Country political boundaries. The decision affects the way prison inmates are counted as state Assembly and Senate districts are drawn up.

In that process, some communities, including Malone, Ogdensburg and Watertown, will lose a significant portion of their population. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Richard Stratton's Federal incarceration ID (Source: R. Stratton)
Richard Stratton's Federal incarceration ID (Source: R. Stratton)

The view from inside a North Country prison

Here in the North Country, we're surrounded by neighbors most of us never see. Thousands of prison inmates live invisibly in Malone, the Tri-Lakes, Dannemora, Ogdensburg and a half-dozen other towns. In the late 1980s, the novelist and filmmaker Richard Stratton spent more than a year at the Federal prison in Ray Brook, following his conviction for smuggling large quantities of marijuana. Stratton wrote about the experience for the latest issue of Adirondack Life magazine and he spoke with Brian Mann.  Go to full article

Broken Bus Strands Inmate Visitors

Dozens of women and children were stranded Sunday night at a rest stop on the Northway. They were visiting inmates at north country prisons. The chartered bus broke down Sunday evening and the family-members were left stranded until mid-day on Monday, when a replacemente bus picked them up. State police fed and cared for at least thirty-five people, most from New York City. The owners of the bus company couldn't be reached for comment. Brian Mann spoke Monday with Danielle from Astoria Queens, who declined to give her last name.  Go to full article

Journey North A Burden For Inmate Families

Hundreds of family-members make the pilgrimage north every weekend to visit incarcerated men. Jack Beck, with the Correctional Association of New York says it's a burden, especially for poor working families.  Go to full article

Inmates, Families Boycott High Phone Rates

Today, inmates around New York State will pick up the phone to call their families - collect, as always. But this time, families will refuse to accept the charges. It's a one-day boycott to protest the high rates charged by the phone company MCI. MCI has had an exclusive contract to provide phone service for inmates since 1999. Rates for the prisoners' collect calls are more than six times higher than regular consumer rates. Inmates can only call collect, and the charges add up for families on the other end. Advocates say that these high rates threaten inmates' family ties - a crucial bulwark against recidivism. They're also critical of the contract deal. MCI gives over half the profits to the state. Advocates call that a kickback scheme. But the contract is set to expire at the end of March, and the State Senate appears set to make a change. Gregory Warner reports.  Go to full article

Celebrating the Holidays with Ray Brook Inmates

Doing time is never easy, but the holidays can be especially hard. Last year, Brian Mann visited the state prison at Ray Brook, where inmates with good records enjoyed a rare celebration with their wives and children.  Go to full article

Petition to Include Inmates in Redistricting Census Falls Short

A petition drive to force a public referendum on whether to include inmates in St. Lawrence County's redistricting plan has come up short of valid signatures. Legislator Jim MaFadden is one of four county legislators who oppose the plan.  Go to full article

NY Prison Population Shrinks for First Year Since 1972

The Federal Bureau of Prisons says New York's inmate population fell nearly four percent last year. Vermont's prison population went the other direction, rising more than ten percent. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Correctional Hiring Freeze Means Fewer Prison Jobs in North

State officials say a smaller inmate population will mean fewer prison guards in the North Country. A hiring freeze has been extended to 36 correctional facilities. As Brian Mann reports, more than 600 prison jobs will be eliminated statewide.  Go to full article

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