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News stories tagged with "innovation-trail"

Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/willia4/1404659376/sizes/z/in/photolist-398fi7-8qsmXC-8qskUN-8qsdZS-8qp4Mz-8qp6Dt-8qskw5-8qsedf-8qp51n-8qskHo-6JTJWs-cf4Wd-8qsev1-8qp7kc-8qp4gc-8qp7Kv-8qskhW-6WFbeN-6WFvUw-6WF8wQ-6WFx5W-6WF5Aj-6WFmxN-6WBB7t-6WF4Ds-6WB9Lr-6WBhJ4-6WEMoW-nranY-8jcWGr-6WBzmP-jkEHiw-8sZ2r4-6WETe3-6WAXqi-6WAZZM-6WAYHD-jRPPB-dhtdSE-6WBxNB-5vbfnS-ap8PTw-4uLHVP-5H49Dy-dR7Pi5-7e64j3-8n9vQm-cmFNP-ahspds-6fuGEB-7BGpw3/">James Williams</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: James Williams, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Could a new law "kneecap" NYS boutique wines?

Bottles of wine and spirits made in New York would have to sit in a New York state warehouse for up to 48 hours before they could be sold, under a new law being considered in Albany.

It sounds like a small thing, but for many wineries and distilleries, it's big.
In a letter this week, the Doolittles, of Frontenac Point Vineyard in Trumansburg, write the "at rest" legislation would make it prohibitively expensive for small operations to deliver wine to downstate accounts. They're part of a larger movement to defeat the bill.  Go to full article
A game of dominos at HopePrint's house on the Northside of Syracuse. Photo: Ryan Delaney, WRVO
A game of dominos at HopePrint's house on the Northside of Syracuse. Photo: Ryan Delaney, WRVO

Refugees re-shape a Syracuse neighborhood

Upstate New York's cities take in around 90% of all refugees coming to the state. As they adapt to new homes, the newcomers re-shape neighborhoods.

Every Tuesday evening, a home at 129 Lilac Street on Syracuse's Northside turns into a community center.  Go to full article
Abdullahi Majeni, Jeylani Semboga and Mganga Mbwera, help run a Somali-Bantu community group. Photo: Ryan Delaney<br />	<br />
Abdullahi Majeni, Jeylani Semboga and Mganga Mbwera, help run a Somali-Bantu community group. Photo: Ryan Delaney

Refugees pump life into post-industrial Utica

Utica has long seen itself as a city of immigrants. The arrival of Italians, Germans and Irish drove the city's population to peak at around 100,000. During the mid 1970's in the wake of major changes to the city's industrial base and dwindling employment opportunities, the population fell by nearly half.

"This city that we have now," said Joe Marino, a city councilor, "these new refugees really, really rebuilt the city."  Go to full article
Wendy Oakes-Wilson and Darrell Oakes at a key intersection in their u-pick orchard. Photo by Ashley Hirtzel
Wendy Oakes-Wilson and Darrell Oakes at a key intersection in their u-pick orchard. Photo by Ashley Hirtzel

Cider-makers hope for help from Washington

During the heart of apple picking season lawmakers in the House of Representatives are considering a bill that would make hard cider-makers' business lives easier, and their cider better.

The CIDER Act would simplify the federal tax regulations for hard cider - and allow cider-makers to keep more natural apple flavor in their products.

LynOaken Farms is hoping for both measures to pass. LynOaken is a big operation in western New York, with a farm market and winery, an event center under construction, and orchards full of heritage apples as well as new varieties.

Wendy Oakes-Wilson gave The Innovation Trail's Ashley Hirtzel a wagon ride around the farm's "u-pick" section, where a familiar color scheme manages traffic.  Go to full article
Developer Erich Seber gives local officials a tour of the Woolworth building in downtown Watertown. Photo: Joanna Richards
Developer Erich Seber gives local officials a tour of the Woolworth building in downtown Watertown. Photo: Joanna Richards

Developers eager to revive Watertown Woolworth building

After founding his first stores elsewhere, Jefferson County's Frank Winfield Woolworth bought the building in Watertown where he'd gotten his start in the dry goods business, intending to raze it and build one of his own stores. Woolworth died before he could see it, but his company realized his plan and the building's a central part of the early history of the five-and-dime chain. After years of vacancy, two developers have plans to revive the landmark.  Go to full article
A heatmap visualization of the prevalence of flu in New York City, as observed through public Twitter data. Image via <a href="http://www.cs.rochester.edu/~sadilek/research/">Adam Sadilek</a>, University of Rochester
A heatmap visualization of the prevalence of flu in New York City, as observed through public Twitter data. Image via Adam Sadilek, University of Rochester

Using a smart phone to avoid the flu

The health industry in upstate New York is undergoing some rapid transformations, and all this week we're featuring reports from the Innovation Trail team on innovation in the region's health care sector. Today, imagine using your smart phone to avoid getting the flu. A new mobile app designed by researchers at the University of Rochester sifts through twitter feeds and alerts users to who around them might be contagious.  Go to full article

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Labor Department deploys unemployment response teams

A report from the New York State Labor Department shows the unemplyment rate in Upstate New York has gone up almost one percent in the past year, to 8.5 per cent as of August.

This past week, a mobile response team from the Labor Department began touring regions with the highest unemployment rates, with the goal of getting the long-term unemployed back to work.  Go to full article
Say Yes to Education hosted a resume workshop for city teens this summer. Photo: Stephen Sartori/Say Yes to Education
Say Yes to Education hosted a resume workshop for city teens this summer. Photo: Stephen Sartori/Say Yes to Education

Program looks to improve troubled Syracuse schools

It's estimated that one in four young people drop out of high school each year. This represents real trouble in terms of their future happiness, health and success, and it's a challenge to the ongoing development of an innovative and productive American workforce, as many young people feel disconnected from study and work.

In Syracuse, the situation is tough: The city's population is declining, and enrollment and funding for its schools are down. The city's graduation rate is barely 50 percent.

But a new program called "Say Yes to Education", implemented a few years ago, could improve the schools and the city.  Go to full article

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