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News stories tagged with "international-joint-commission"

IJC Chairwoman Irene Brooks faced a determined crowd at an earlier water level hearing in Alexandria Bay. Tonight's hearing will be at the Bonnie Castle Resort from 6-9 pm. Photo: David Sommerstein
IJC Chairwoman Irene Brooks faced a determined crowd at an earlier water level hearing in Alexandria Bay. Tonight's hearing will be at the Bonnie Castle Resort from 6-9 pm. Photo: David Sommerstein

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence water level plan draws mixed reviews

The International Joint Commission, or IJC, that governs water levels on Lake Ontario and St Lawrence River is presenting a new management plan in a series of public hearings in New York and Canada this week.

Plan 2014 aims to strike a compromise between the economic interests of harbor communities and the environmental concerns over current water level management.

The previous draft plan drew praise from environmental groups, but criticism from some shoreline owners, particularly along the southern shore of Lake Ontario.

In Rochester yesterday, about 100 locals weighing in on the conversation showed views are still split.  Go to full article
Matt Regan, researcher with SUNY's College of Environmental Science and Forestry, helps students churn up the dirt to expose the seed bank after removing cattails from a plot at Eel Bay, on Wellesley Island. Photo: Joanna Richards
Matt Regan, researcher with SUNY's College of Environmental Science and Forestry, helps students churn up the dirt to expose the seed bank after removing cattails from a plot at Eel Bay, on Wellesley Island. Photo: Joanna Richards

Kids study water levels' impact on St. Lawrence wetlands

Construction of the giant hydropower dam near Massena in the 1950s forever tamed the once-wild St. Lawrence River. It allowed engineers to harness the river's natural ebb and flow for energy production and to protect homes and ports at the same time. But in the process, it hurt the indigenous plants and animals that depend on those highs and lows to survive.

The environmental group Save The River has been leading a charge to persuade the agency that controls water levels to return more natural ebbs and flows to the St. Lawrence. One way is by giving the younger generation of River residents a "hands-on" lesson.  Go to full article
Wetlands along the St. Lawrence River. Photo: Jenni Werndorf
Wetlands along the St. Lawrence River. Photo: Jenni Werndorf

Owens backs IJC water levels plan

North Country congressman Bill Owens says he's supporting the International Joint Commission's new water levels plan for the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario.

The plan, known as BV7, would replace one that's been in effect for 60 years. The old plan strictly regulated water levels; the new one will allow them to fluctuate more naturally.  Go to full article
The International Joint Commission in St Armand, Quebec
The International Joint Commission in St Armand, Quebec

Public hearings in VT, Quebec on phosphorus in Lake Champlain's Missisquoi Bay

Missisquoi Bay is in the northeast corner of Lake Champlain, along the Vermont-Quebec border. The bay has some of the highest phosphorus concentrations in the lake and is frequently plagued by blue/green algae. In 2008, the US government asked the International Joint Commission, a bi-national body that helps manage US and Canadian boundary waters, to assist in reducing phosphorus levels in the bay.

They've now completed a study that identifies where the phosphorus is coming from and how it gets to the lake. Two public hearings are underway to discuss the results. Sarah Harris was at last night's meeting in Saint Armand, Quebec and has more.  Go to full article
The International Joint Commission focuses on water levels in the Great Lake system.
The International Joint Commission focuses on water levels in the Great Lake system.

Save the River focuses on water levels plan

A new plan for controlling water levels in Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River will be the main agenda item at Save the River's annual conference at the Clayton Opera House this weekend.

The new plan allows water levels to stay high (or low) for longer periods than the current plan does. The more natural fluctuations are intended to restore diversity in the shoreline ecosystems. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Water Levels Cut Into Marina Business

Researchers from Cornell University are asking marina owners along the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario how changes in water levels affect their businesses. The survey is part of a study to update a 45 year old plan for controlling water levels in the region. David Sommerstein has more.  Go to full article

Former Congressman David Martin Named to International Joint Commission

A former North Country Congressman has been nominated by President Bush to serve on the body that oversees water levels in the Great Lakes system. Davis Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

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