Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "invasive"

The garden-variety earthworm is a modern interloper in the northern forests. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Earthworm.jpg">Fir0002/Flagstaffotos</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
The garden-variety earthworm is a modern interloper in the northern forests. Photo: Fir0002/Flagstaffotos, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Invasive earthworms

Earthworms, friend to lawn and garden, are actually an invasive species in northern forests, which developed in the worm-free environment of retreating glaciers 10,000 years ago. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss their return, and the consequences for boreal soil, trees and wildflowers.  Go to full article
White nose syndrome in a New York cave (Photo:  Al Hicks, NYS DEC)
White nose syndrome in a New York cave (Photo: Al Hicks, NYS DEC)

White nose syndrome ravages bat populations as it spreads west

White Nose Syndrome is a deadly bat disease that continues to spread rapidly across the U.S. It was first identified in a cave near Albany in 2006. In the six years since, it's wiped out 90% of the population of bats in many caves across northern New York and Vermont. Researchers have made headway identifying the fungal disease, but they've found no way to stop it from infecting new sites as far away as western Ontario and Missouri.

Brian Mann checked in with Mollie Mattieson, with the Center for Biological Diversity in Vermont, which has been one of the leading environmental groups working on white nose syndrome. She is just back from a national conference on the disease and says much of the news is still bleak.  Go to full article
Forest Pathologist Dale Bergdahl is an expert in the butternut tree and the canker that's killing the species<br />Photo by Jane Lindholm
Forest Pathologist Dale Bergdahl is an expert in the butternut tree and the canker that's killing the species
Photo by Jane Lindholm

Researchers hope for a "super" butternut tree

Butternut trees are dying across the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada. A fungus is killing the big trees much like Dutch elm disease killed American elms over the last century. And just as scientists are producing resistant elms, butternut researchers hope they'll be able to produce a "super" butternut that will fight off the canker killing the old native trees.
VPR's Jane Lindholm, as Part of NPR's Local News Initiative and collaborative environmental reporting among public radio stations in the northeast, has the story.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: Washing boats to stop spread of invasive species

Invasive species have been a problem in the North Country since the first zebra mussels arrived from the Caspian Sea in Asia. These and many other invasives came up the St Lawrence Seaway in the ballast tanks of ocean going freighters. A recent study found that throughout the Great Lakes region industries from sport fishing to forestry could lose $200 million as invasives crowd out indigenous species. Trans-Atlantic ships coming up the St Lawrence are now required to flush their ballast tanks before entering the Great Lakes. But there are other more local efforts to stop the spread of invasives, even from one Adirondack pond to the next. And one of these efforts is today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article

Online map of wildlife diseases available

There's a new online map for tracking wildlife diseases that threaten animals and people. Chuck Quirmbach reports.  Go to full article
Sirex woodwasps
Sirex woodwasps

Invasives spread across North Country; threaten Adirondack Park

The Sirex wood wasp has now spread across most of New York and virtually all the North Country. By burrowing and laying eggs in pine and scotch trees, the invasive insect kills them by introducing a fungus into their sap. As Jonathan Brown reports, officials with the state Department of Environmental Conservation are considering hauling restrictions, and possibly quarantines, to keep the wasps from spreading further.  Go to full article
Emerald ash borer
Emerald ash borer

Keeping out some nasty, wood-eating invaders

State environmental officials are warning people about bringing firewood srom down-state to camps and campgrounds in the North Country. As Jonathan Brown reports, the concern is over some destructive insects hitching rides in firewood and spreading across the northeast and into Canada.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Round Goby

The Round Goby followed its Caspian/Black Sea neighbor, the zebra mussel, into the St. Lawrence River and Great Lakes around 1990. It is displacing its less aggressive local relative, the sculpin, and harming populations of game fish. On the other hand, it eats zebra mussels. Dr Curt Stager and Martha Foley talk about the downs and ups of invasive species, and efforts to slow their spread into American waters.  Go to full article
Chinese mitten crab
Chinese mitten crab

Scientists Keep Tabs on Exotic Crab

Biologists are asking people to keep their eyes peeled for another potential invader into the St. Lawrence River. A Chinese mitten crab was found near Quebec City last fall. Like the American Eel, the mitten crab spawns in the ocean, so it's unlikely to proliferate in Lakes Ontario or Erie. But the St. Lawrence may be more welcoming habitat. David Sommerstein spoke with David MacNeill. He's a fisheries specialist with New York Sea Grant Extension in Oswego. He says biologists aren't sounding the alarm yet because one Chinese mitten crab hardly constitutes an invasion. But he says the discovery highlights the failure of ballast discharge rules for foreign ships entering the St. Lawrence Seaway.  Go to full article
With its ability to breathe out of water and wriggle its way over land during dry spells, the media has dubbed the northern snakehead "Frankenfish."  (Photo courtesy of USGS)
With its ability to breathe out of water and wriggle its way over land during dry spells, the media has dubbed the northern snakehead "Frankenfish." (Photo courtesy of USGS)

Invasive Fish Rears Ugly Head in Great Lakes

Last month, a Chicago fisherman caused a stir when he found a northern snakehead fish. The discovery set off a frantic search to find out if yet another invasive species is threatening the Great Lakes. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Jenny Lawton reports.  Go to full article

1-10 of 12  next 2 »  last »