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News stories tagged with "invasive-plants"

Brendan Querion wades into a stand of Giant Hogweed. Photo: Brian Mann
Brendan Querion wades into a stand of Giant Hogweed. Photo: Brian Mann

Giant Hogweed is a plant invader that threatens people as much as ecoystems

The last couple of decades, northern New York has been besieged by invasive plants and animals. The impact on the region's ecosystems has been profound. An invasive fungus called White Nose Syndrome has devastated once-thriving populations of bats. Zebra mussels and other non-native organisms are literally changing the chemistry of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River.

For the most part, however, the foreign invaders haven't posed a threat to human health. But now, scientists, environmentalists and farmers are battling a nasty invasive plant from Eurasia called giant hogweed. As Brian Mann reports, the massive plant can cause serious injury and even blindness.  Go to full article
Emily in the garden at Fiddlehead Creek Nursery (Source:  FC Nursery)
Emily in the garden at Fiddlehead Creek Nursery (Source: FC Nursery)

Going native in the garden means tracking down the right North Country plants

Gardeners are sort of like small-scale environmentalists. They create gorgeous little habitats that are often havens for birds and insects.

But gardeners can also cause a lot of problems, by using too many chemicals and by importing non-native plants.

There's a movement in the North Country to fill out lush and beautiful gardens with native plants.

Supporters say local alternatives are hardier -- more pest- and drought-resistant. Brian Mann visited a local plant sale in Keene and has our story.  Go to full article
The invasive Eurasian water milfoil
The invasive Eurasian water milfoil

Homeowners on St Lawrence prepare to spend $100,000 fighting invasive plant

Invasive species have been wreaking havoc across northern New York for decades now. Foreign fish, plants and insects--many carried by freighters plying the St Lawrence River--threaten native species, the environment and the use of waterways and woodlands.

People living on Goose Bay on the St Lawrence, east of the town of Alexandria Bay, are banding together to fight Eurasian water milfoil. The plant's green fronds can fill up lakes and rivers, essentially choking the water and all that lives in or uses it.

Bill Skvarch with the non-profit Goose Bay Reclamation Corporation tells Jonathan Brown this is what's happening in his bay.  Go to full article

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