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News stories tagged with "invasives"

Spotted wing fruit fly, <em>Drosophila suzukii</em>. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/31031835@N08/9902714764/">John Tann</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Spotted wing fruit fly, Drosophila suzukii. Photo: John Tann, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Invasive Asian fruit fly devastates Northeast berry crops

A new invasive insect that devastates berry crops threatens millions of dollars worth of the fall harvest in the northeast. It's called the Asian spotted wing fruit fly, and it was found in the North Country late last month.

In a press release, Paul Hetzler, of the Canton office of Cornell Cooperative Extension, says a female fruit fly was caught in a monitoring trap near Canton on August 25.  Go to full article
Sea lamprey larvae that washed up on shore. The longer they are, the older they are. Inset: mouth of adult lamprey, courtesy US Fish and Wildlife Service. Photo: Sarah Harris
Sea lamprey larvae that washed up on shore. The longer they are, the older they are. Inset: mouth of adult lamprey, courtesy US Fish and Wildlife Service. Photo: Sarah Harris

Combating sea lamprey on Lake Champlain

It's not easy to control invasive species like Eurasian watermilfoil and spiny water flea once they've established themselves in a waterbody. But scientists have learned how to control some of the region's other water-borne pests, including sea lampreys.

Lampreys attach to fish and suck out their body fluids. Environmental officials from Vermont and New York regularly treat rivers and deltas leading into Lake Champlain with lampricides to control the lamprey population.

Two years ago reporter Sarah Harris joined scientists as they treated the Saranac River delta in Plattsburgh, N.Y. She sent this report.  Go to full article
Sprayer booms on the treatment boat apply the lampricide in the Saranac River delta leading into Lake Champlain. Photo: Sarah Harris
Sprayer booms on the treatment boat apply the lampricide in the Saranac River delta leading into Lake Champlain. Photo: Sarah Harris

Lake Champlain lamprey treatment set

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) Federal fish and wildlife officials along with their counterparts in Vermont and New York have set the fall schedule for treating Lake Champlain tributaries in the two states.

The Lake Champlain Fish and Wildlife Management Cooperative will be applying lamprey killing chemicals to six tributaries and three delta areas during September and October.  Go to full article
Norris Berry Farm in Monkton, VT. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/found_drama/3888672864/">Rob Friesel</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Norris Berry Farm in Monkton, VT. Photo: Rob Friesel, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Northeast berry farms fight late-season fruit fly

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) Northeast berry growers are learning ways to combat an invasive fruit fly that wiped out 80 percent of some farms' late-season fruit two years ago, forcing some small growers out of business.

The tiny spotted wing drosophila arrived in the U.S. from Asia in 2008 and turned up in the Northeast in 2011.  Go to full article
Spiny water fleas. Photo: National Park Service
Spiny water fleas. Photo: National Park Service

Gunky, icky spiny water flea spreads in Adirondacks

Scientists and activists studying invasive species say the spiny water flea is spreading to more lakes in the Adirondack Park.

The organism had already been found in Great Sacandaga and Lake George. This summer, the invasive creature was found in Lake Pleasant and Piseco Lake.  Go to full article
Invasive Eurasian watermilfoil in Saratoga Lake. Photo: Janice Painter, CC some rights reserved
Invasive Eurasian watermilfoil in Saratoga Lake. Photo: Janice Painter, CC some rights reserved

Beating invasive water milfoil, year by year

New York state's first-ever Invasive Species Awareness Week is drawing to a close.

There's been a slew of public outreach and education initiatives - all to help educate the public about invasive species on land and in water, and ways to stop their spread.

One took paddlers to Upper Saranac Lake to learn about a successful and ongoing 10-year campaign to rid the lake of Eurasian watermilfoil.  Go to full article
Invasive wild parsnip. Avoid contact; avoid a nasty rash. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/dmills727/3644070846/">Douglas Mills</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Invasive wild parsnip. Avoid contact; avoid a nasty rash. Photo: Douglas Mills, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Beware the invasives; and small strawberries are good too!

Right about now, the roadsides can look more like flower gardens than some gardens do. Wonderful abundant mixes of color, texture, height: all the qualities you look for. Driving the back roads is more of a pleasure than ever.

But beware of a nasty, if beautiful, invasive plant that's taking over the verges in more and more areas. Wild parsnip looks kind of like a tall, yellow Queen Ann's Lace. But don't pick: it reacts with sunlight to produce a painful, scarring rash. Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy says it's a great idea to mow it down to control it's spread, but make sure all your skin is covered when you do. It's bad.  Go to full article
Nylanderia pubens, the tawny crazy ant (worker variety). Photo: <a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d4/Nylanderia_pubens_worker.png">Daniel Mietchen</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Nylanderia pubens, the tawny crazy ant (worker variety). Photo: Daniel Mietchen, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

The tawny crazy ant is coming to America

What can take on the big agressive poisonous fire ants that invaded the U.S. decades ago? The tawny crazy ant, also an import from South America. This new "superorganism" is immune to fire ant poison, and they are displacing the previous invaders.

Martha Foley and Curt Stager discuss a new addition to the invasive species list.  Go to full article
Spiny water flea. Photo: J. Liebig, NOAA
Spiny water flea. Photo: J. Liebig, NOAA

Spiny water flea poised to invade Lake Champlain

Spiny water flea isn't actually a flea at all. It's an invasive zoplankton that cuts down on food supply for fish and annoys anglers.

Spiny water flea's in the Great Lakes. In 2008, it made its way to Great Sacandaga Lake, and then to Lake George in 2012. Now, it's headed for Lake Champlain.  Go to full article
Sea Lamprey <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/noaa_glerl/4076027154/">NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Sea Lamprey NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

New York takes aim at Seneca Lake lamprey

AVON, N.Y. (AP) New York state is taking steps to control the population of parasitic sea lampreys around Seneca Lake to protect other fish species.

The state's Department of Environmental Conservation says that next week it will begin treating tributaries of Seneca Lake with a chemical that kills lamprey larva but is harmless to most other aquatic wildlife.  Go to full article

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