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News stories tagged with "invasives"

A mute swan. Photo: DEC website
A mute swan. Photo: DEC website

DEC proposal to kill swans doesn't fly with animal lovers

Most people think swans are beautiful. But the agreement seems to end there, when it comes to a new state plan to manage them. A proposal by the Department of Environmental Conservation to kill invasive mute swans isn't flying with some animal lovers.  Go to full article
One of the approximately 11,000 fish released. Photo: Sarah Harris.
One of the approximately 11,000 fish released. Photo: Sarah Harris.

Stocking sturgeon in the St. Lawrence

The St. Lawrence River has more sturgeon than it did yesterday. About 11,000 baby sturgeon were released into the St. Lawrence and its tributaries.

State environmental officials hope to restore the sturgeon population in the region.  Go to full article
Senator Little won approval for a series of measures, but still wants a deal that would keep Lake Placid's hospital open part-time. Photo: Mark Kurtz
Senator Little won approval for a series of measures, but still wants a deal that would keep Lake Placid's hospital open part-time. Photo: Mark Kurtz

Little still fighting for part-time ER in Lake Placid

With just over 24 hours to go before the session closes in Albany, state Senator Betty Little from Queensbury has pushed through a series of bills affecting the Adirondack North Country.

Yesterday, the Assembly approved two land swaps in the Park -- measures that will still need voter approval when they appear on the ballot this November.

Lawmakers also supported a measure banning the importation of Eurasian swine -- the kind of pig that can go feral if released into the wild.

Little told Brian Mann she still hopes to win approval of a bill that would allow Lake Placid's hospital emergency room to remain open part time.  Go to full article
Ship discharging ballast water. Photo US Geological Survey
Ship discharging ballast water. Photo US Geological Survey

National Wildlife Federation expands challenge to new invasives rules

A national environmental group is expanding its legal challenge to new state and Federal rules designed to keep invasive species out the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Great Lakes.

Neil Kagan, senior counsel with the National Wildlife Federation, says new standards aren't strict enough to keep dangerous organisms from reaching the US in the ballast water of ships, "Neither the EPA permit, nor the state's certification of that are sufficient to prevent new invasive species from coming into New York waters."

The National Wildlife Federation is already suing New York, pushing the state to adopt tougher standards.  Go to full article
Kristen Rohne, an educator with the Lake George Association, sieves for Asian clams during a lakewide survey completed in September 2012. Photo: Emily DeBolt, Lake George Association
Kristen Rohne, an educator with the Lake George Association, sieves for Asian clams during a lakewide survey completed in September 2012. Photo: Emily DeBolt, Lake George Association

Washington, Essex counties consider regional invasive controls

Washington and Essex counties are considering joining Warren County in banning the transport of invasive species by boats trailered from one body of water to another.

The proposals come as the region pushes boaters toward washing stations at major boat launches on Lake George this year.  Go to full article
Spiny water flea. Photo: J. Liebig, NOAA
Spiny water flea. Photo: J. Liebig, NOAA

Few options for control of spiny water flea

Discovery of the spiny water flea in Lake George has heightened worries that the invasive species will eventually move into Lake Champlain.

And it's brought new attention to the danger of the Champlain Canal, an open waterway between Lake Champlain and the Hudson River.

This past summer, spiny water fleas were found in the canal, and in several areas of Lake George as well. That triggered a quick response from a task force of New York and Vermont experts.  Go to full article
Sea lamprey larvae that washed up on shore. The longer they are, the older they are. Inset: mouth of adult lamprey, courtesy US Fish and Wildlife Service. Photo: Sarah Harris
Sea lamprey larvae that washed up on shore. The longer they are, the older they are. Inset: mouth of adult lamprey, courtesy US Fish and Wildlife Service. Photo: Sarah Harris

Combating sea lamprey on Lake Champlain

If you're fishing for salmon or lake trout in Lake Champlain, you might end up with a fish you didn't bargain for. Sea lamprey are parasitic fish that look like eels. They latch on to larger fish and slowly drain out their body fluids.

Lamprey can decimate entire fish populations, so every four years the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, with help from the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and New York's DEC, treats Lake Champlain tributaries with pesticides to control lamprey populations. This year's first treatment took place last week in the Saranac River delta in Plattsburgh.  Go to full article
Adult hover fly. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/malcolm_nq/">Malcolm Tattersall</a> cc, <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Adult hover fly. Photo: Malcolm Tattersall cc, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Hover Flies

A common invasive species, the hover fly, or drone fly, looks remarkably like a honeybee. But in its youth, it carries the loathsome monicker "rat-tailed maggot". Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss Batesian mimicry: innocuous creatures who imitate more dangerous species.  Go to full article
Cover detail: 2012 State of the Lake Report from the Lake Champlain Basin Program
Cover detail: 2012 State of the Lake Report from the Lake Champlain Basin Program

State of the Lake: new report investigates water quality and health of Lake Champlain

Every few years the Lake Champlain Basin Program publishes a "state of the lake" report, detailing environmental quality in Lake Champlain. This year's report came out last week.

It says that while the overall health of the main lake is good, certain areas, like the Northeast arm and Missisquoi Bay, have higher levels of phosphorus pollution and algae blooms. Sarah Harris spoke with Bill Howland, director of the Basin Program, about the report.  Go to full article
Hydrilla. Photo: Purdue Extension
Hydrilla. Photo: Purdue Extension

NY boaters asked to help prevent spread of invasive water plant

Hydrilla is one of the most aggressive, invasive water plants. Its long, trailing stems form thick mats that prevent native water vegetation and fish from getting enough oxygen, light and nutrients.

Hydrilla was found at Cayuga Inlet, near Ithaca, last August. If unchecked it could spread Cayuga Lake, other Finger Lakes, as well as Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. Cornell Cooperative Extension is warning recreational boaters to take precautions and prevent the spread of the invasive plant. Sarah Harris has more.  Go to full article

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