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News stories tagged with "irene"

Vermont lawmakers face busy session

The Vermont legislature convened in Montpelier yesterday for the first day of the 2012 legisaltive session. It's session is expected to be a busy one, with lawmakers determining how to fill a multi-million dollar budget gap and recover from Tropical Storm Irene.  Go to full article
Bill Ferebee examines flood damage in May 2011. File photo: Brian Mann
Bill Ferebee examines flood damage in May 2011. File photo: Brian Mann

In New Year, Ausable Valley towns wrestle with aftermath of Irene

2012 is officially underway, but for towns along the Ausable River, there's still a lot of work ahead cleaning up from the floods of 2011. Communities were hit hard by heavy spring rains last year, and then slammed by tropical storm Irene in late summer.

Brian Mann checked in last week with Bill Ferebee, town supervisor in Keene. Ferebee says a lot of progress has been made restoring normalcy in the Ausable Valley. But fears remain that more floods could come next spring.  Go to full article
State Rt. 73, the highway from Keene Valley to the Northway, the week after flash floods of Tropical Strom Irene. (Photo: Brian Mann)
State Rt. 73, the highway from Keene Valley to the Northway, the week after flash floods of Tropical Strom Irene. (Photo: Brian Mann)

FEMA working with state, local government on repair costs

FEMA has already paid out more than $150 million to New Yorkers who were affected by tropical storms Irene and Lee. And more financial help is on the way for state and local governments.  Go to full article

Local pushback on USGS plan to cut river gauges

A plan by Federal officials to shut down river gauges on the Ausable and the Boquet Rivers is drawing criticism from scientists and politicians.  Go to full article
A mobile home uprooted by Irene. Photo by Kathy Regan.
A mobile home uprooted by Irene. Photo by Kathy Regan.

Towns can't afford state's flood property tax break

A new state law aims to help property owners hurt by storms earlier this year.

The Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee Assessment Relief Act was signed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo earlier this month.

It lets local governments and school districts provide tax relief - including refunds - to people whose property was significantly devalued by the storms in late August and early September.

But as Chris Morris reports, some local governments may not implement the law without financial assistance from the state.  Go to full article
Backhoes are still at work along the Ausable River (PHOTOS:  BRIAN MANN)
Backhoes are still at work along the Ausable River (PHOTOS: BRIAN MANN)

Reconstruction work begins on Ausable River and its tributaries

In the weeks following tropical storm Irene, environmental groups blasted state and local officials for dredging and straightening sections of the Ausable River. The work was done in an effort to prevent future flooding and to protect neighborhoods in Keene, Jay and Ausable Forks. But critics say the dredging damaged crucial fish habitat and gave the river an unnatural appearance. As Todd More reports, efforts have now begin to restore the Ausable.  Go to full article
Anya Morgan, left, of Upper Jay, tells Allie Burke about volunteer work she did after Tropical Storm Irene. Photo: coutesy Adirondack Daily Enterprise. Irene damage photo: Susan Waters.
Anya Morgan, left, of Upper Jay, tells Allie Burke about volunteer work she did after Tropical Storm Irene. Photo: coutesy Adirondack Daily Enterprise. Irene damage photo: Susan Waters.

Students listen for untold Irene stories

The history of the floods that flashed through the Adirondacks during Tropical Storm Irene will be told in pictures, statistics, and press archives. Now a group of students from Vermont's Burlington College will add an audio-documentary of personal stories told by the people who's lives were affected.

Allie Burke and Colin Donaghey, students in John Warren's "Oral History and Audio Documentary" class, set up their recording equipment at the Keene Community Center. Chris Morris stopped by and has this report.  Go to full article
These are really qualitative stories. People's experiences, rather than the numbers, figures and dates.

Oral history project to collect Keene, Jay memories of Irene

A group of Burlington College students will conduct oral history interviews to record the Tropical Storm Irene stories of Jay and Keene residents this Saturday at the Keene Community Center. Everyone is invited to share their stories and memories. Instructor John Warren told Todd Moe that participants will be asked a number of questions about their experiences during the storm, and will have the chance to tell the stories they think are important to remember. To schedule your interview, contact John Warren via email at jnwarrenjr@gmail.com or call 518-956-3830.  Go to full article
They don't want to leave - it's their community.

Flood recovery work continues in hard hit towns in the Adirondacks

North Country Congressman Bill Owens says he's amazed at the resiliency of flood victims who say their property devastated by Tropical Storm Irene. The Democrat from New York's 23rd Congressional District stopped in the Town of Jay this week to hear from local officials about ongoing infrastructure issues and view firsthand some of the problems the community still faces.  Go to full article
Can this kind of devastating flood be avoided in the future?  NCPR file photo
Can this kind of devastating flood be avoided in the future? NCPR file photo

Locals demand Ausable River plan, state and Federal agencies reluctant

River towns in the Adirondacks are still reeling from floods that struck last spring and again after tropical storm Irene dumped torrential rains on the High Peaks in late August. Communities like Keene and Jay have been forced to borrow millions of dollars to pay for emergency repairs and many families still haven't seen their water supplies restored.

As towns begin to rebuild, there are growing fears that the Ausable River is growing more dangerous and needs some kind of management plan to prevent future floods. The idea is that more aggressive dredging and channelizing of the river could protect neighborhoods and businesses.

But as Brian Mann reports, so far no government agency has shown a willingness to take on the challenge and cost of managing one of the region's wildest rivers.  Go to full article

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