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News stories tagged with "jack-layton"

NDP Leader Jack Layton. Photo: Wikipedia Commons
NDP Leader Jack Layton. Photo: Wikipedia Commons

Canada mourns NDP leader Jack Layton

Canadian politician Jack Layton died at home in Toronto early Monday morning, surrounded by family and friends.

Layton's dynamic leadership vaulted the New Democratic Party to unprecedented success this past May. The 61-year-old Layton stepped down as leader of the official opposition in late July to deal with a second bout of cancer. At the time, he said he hoped to be back when Parliament resumed in September.

Canadians from across the political spectrum are saluting Layton's contributions to his party and his country. Lucy Martin has more.  Go to full article
NDP Leader Jack Layton. Photo: Wikipedia Commons
NDP Leader Jack Layton. Photo: Wikipedia Commons

NDP's Jack Layton dies at age 61

Canadian politician Jack Layton died at home in Toronto early this morning, in the company of family and friends. Layton's dynamic leadership vaulted the New Democratic Party to unprecedented success in Canada's most recent election this past May. The 61-year-old Layton stepped down as leader of the official opposition in late July to deal with a second bout of cancer. At the time, he said he hoped to be back when Parliament resumed in September.

Canadians from across the political spectrum are saluting Layton's contributions to his party and his country.

Lucy Martin has more.  Go to full article

Canada election signals a new order

After leading two minority Conservative governments, Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper has been given what he wanted -- a majority.

A jubilant Harper told cheering supporters in Calgary last night that Canadians can turn the page on the uncertainty of the past seven years, and "focus on building a great future."

The New Democrats will be the official opposition. The longtime opposition party, the Liberals, suffered their worst-ever election showing. And the Bloc Quebecois won only four seats.

With the rise of the social democrat NDP, and the Conservative majority, Canada's political landscape looks even more polarized this morning. Robert Thacker, who teaches in St. Lawrence University's Canadian Studies Department, says voters wanted stability and got it. He spoke with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

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