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News stories tagged with "jeanne-robert-foster"

Swan's "Joaquin Nin-Culmell, composer" - from the collection of Benjamin Franklin V, South Carolina.
Swan's "Joaquin Nin-Culmell, composer" - from the collection of Benjamin Franklin V, South Carolina.

"Lost Art Found," the recovered works by Paul Swan

Todd Moe talks with the curators of a new exhibit at SUNY-Potsdam that includes some of the paintings of artist, actor, dancer, poet and musician Paul Swan. The New York Times called him "America's Leonardo DaVinci," but many of his works disappeared for decades. After years of research, Colton residents Janis and Richard Londraville have uncovered some of the art and life of Paul Swan. With access to Swan's personal papers, letters and an unpublished memoir, the Londraville's have documented the story of his complicated family life, bisexuality and personal eccentricities in the book, The Most Beautiful Man in the World: Paul Swan, from Wilde to Warhol.  Go to full article

Preview: Yeats Festival in Chestertown

Scholars, students and fans of Adirondack poet Jeanne Robert Foster will gather in Chestertown the weekend of September 9th for a conference. The Town of Chester Historical Society and the Yeats Society will host the Second International John Butler Yeats Festival: The Life of Jeanne Robert Foster. The event will focus on Jeanne Foster, her famous friends, her life in the Adirondacks and how that life influenced her poetry. Richard Londraville, who has a summer home in Colton, met Jeanne Foster in the mid-1960s. He's the co-author of Foster's biography and he told Todd Moe that she had a tremendous influence on his life.  Go to full article

Johnsburg Salutes Adirondack Poet & Critic Jeanne Robert Foster

This weekend the Town of Johnsburg, in the south-central Adirondacks, is paying tribute to the life of Adirondack poet and famous literary critic Jeanne Robert Foster. Born in 1879 on Crane Mountain near Johnsburg, her beauty, talent and energy led her to the stage in New York City, and into the literary circles of William Butler Yeats, James Joyce, T.S. Eliott and Ezra Pound. Perhaps most importantly, her poetry and stories of mountain life give us a poignant glimpse into the lives of Adirondack residents in the 19th century. Todd Moe talks with some of the organizers of this weekend's tribute to Jeanne Robert Foster in North Creek.  Go to full article

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