Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "jobs"

Paul Smiths College President John Mills in his office on Tuesday, shortly after announcing major job cuts at the school. Photo:  Brian Mann
Paul Smiths College President John Mills in his office on Tuesday, shortly after announcing major job cuts at the school. Photo: Brian Mann

Paul Smiths College community takes big hit

As NCPR reported yesterday, Paul Smiths College has announced deep, across the board budget cuts that will slash 12 percent of the school's jobs.

The board of trustees declared a "state of financial exigency," which will allow the school to cancel or renegotiate the contracts of as many as 23 full- and part-time employees. The move was triggered by a sharp decline in students enrolling at the small college north of Saranac Lake.

For the close-knit, remote campus, the news was a body blow, affecting employees and community members who have worked at the school for years.  Go to full article
Paul Smiths College President John Mills in his office on Tuesday, shortly after announcing major job cuts at the school.  Photo:  Brian Mann
Paul Smiths College President John Mills in his office on Tuesday, shortly after announcing major job cuts at the school. Photo: Brian Mann

Updated: Paul Smiths College cuts 12% of staff, faculty

Facing declining enrollments and rising costs, Paul Smiths College in the Adirondacks today announced that roughly 12 percent of faculty and staff will be let go. College President John Mills (click "Listen" to hear Brian Mann's interview with Mills) says the "restructuring" plan involves the loss of 23 full- and part-time positions. "I am deeply saddened that we must let go of several people as we restructure our operations," Mills said on Tuesday.

In all, 11 staff and faculty will be laid off, while 12 more jobs will be cut from open positions or people who "have left the college voluntarily."  Go to full article
Gov. Andrew Cuomo paddling on Boreas Pond in North Hudson, in Essex County. NCPR file photo: Brian Mann
Gov. Andrew Cuomo paddling on Boreas Pond in North Hudson, in Essex County. NCPR file photo: Brian Mann

Will the Finch land deal really boost the Adk economy?

Two years ago, when Gov. Andrew Cuomo revived the massive Finch, Pruyn land deal, first engineered by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy in 2007, he shifted the terms of a long-running debate over big land conservation projects in the park.

Funding for open space conservation had been under attack in Albany for years, including a moratorium on new spending. Even many Democrats were questioning the value to taxpayers of protecting more "forever wild" land in the park.

The governor turned that debate on its head, arguing that vast tracts of new public lands would be a boon to the state's tourism economy, rather than a costly burden, and would give struggling Adirondack towns a long-needed boost.  Go to full article
Last year, Glens Falls Hospital opened partnership talks with Albany Medical Center. The community's largest employer has experienced "significant strain" as admissions plummeted.
Last year, Glens Falls Hospital opened partnership talks with Albany Medical Center. The community's largest employer has experienced "significant strain" as admissions plummeted.

Will your North Country hospital survive health care reform?

Yesterday we reported that Lake Placid's emergency room will be the first in New York State to operate on a part-time basis. That experiment is part of a revolution in health care that's sweeping hospitals in the region.

From Ogdensburg to Saranac Lake to Glens Falls, hospitals are seeing far fewer patients and those who come through the door are staying for shorter periods of time. Experts say those changes are positive, meaning better care at a lower cost. But there's a risk that some hospitals won't survive the transition.  Go to full article
Gov. Cuomo launching the Recharge NY program in 2011. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/governorandrewcuomo/5619247915/">Office of Gov. Cuomo</a>
Gov. Cuomo launching the Recharge NY program in 2011. Photo: Office of Gov. Cuomo

Energy program supports 600 jobs at Ticonderoga paper mill

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) Gov. Andrew Cuomo is praising a state program that offers companies access to affordable energy in exchange for the creation or retention of jobs.

The Democratic governor said Wednesday that the initiative, called ReCharge NY, has supported 600 jobs at International Paper's Ticonderoga paper mill.  Go to full article
Downtown Glens Falls. Photo: Mark Kurtz
Downtown Glens Falls. Photo: Mark Kurtz

Growing Glens Falls region means more infrastructure needs

During a visit to Glens Falls yesterday, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand stopped by the campus of Adirondack Community College to meet with local economic development leaders. Unlike much of the North Country, the economy in the Glens Falls region is strong, with unemployment just over 5 percent and a wave of new construction and new businesses.  Go to full article
Doug Huntley, superintendent of Queensbury Union Free school district. Photo courtesy Doug Huntley
Doug Huntley, superintendent of Queensbury Union Free school district. Photo courtesy Doug Huntley

Should schools teach career-specific skills earlier?

Monday at St. Lawrence University, officials, educators and community leaders will gather for the 12th annual North Country Symposium. This year, the day-long conference will focus on sustaining the North Country's schools and ask how education can be more tightly woven into the fabric of North Country life.

One of the keynote speakers believes students need to begin pursuing the skills they'll need for a career earlier. Doug Huntley is superintendent of the Queensbury Union Free school district near Glens Falls, and a former superintendent of Massena Central schools.  Go to full article
Brian Fischer led New York's corrections department for seven years from 2007 until 2013, a time when nine state prisons were mothballed.  Photo:  Brian Mann
Brian Fischer led New York's corrections department for seven years from 2007 until 2013, a time when nine state prisons were mothballed. Photo: Brian Mann

The man who led a revolution inside NY prisons

For decades, New York has maintained one of the largest -- and fastest growing -- prison systems in the country.

At its peak, more than seventy thousand men and women were held in state correctional facilities, many on lengthy mandatory drug sentences.

But over the last few years, the prison system has begun to shrink dramatically, with thirteen facilities closed or in the process of shutting down.

That quiet revolution was led in large part by former Corrections commissioner Brian Fischer, who stepped down last year after seven years in the post.  Go to full article
Alcoa workers at a press conference in 2007 during which the company promised to maintain 1065 jobs. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Alcoa workers at a press conference in 2007 during which the company promised to maintain 1065 jobs. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Alcoa reduces Massena workforce to 750

Alcoa has reached an agreement with New York State to keep its low cost power contract and proceed with a plan to build a new modern potline at its East plant in Massena.

But in the interim, the aluminum giant will reduce its workforce to 750 jobs, below the 900 job threshold it promised three years ago.  Go to full article
Chateaugay Correctional Facility, source of 110 jobs in northern Franklin County, is slated to close in July.  File photo.  Brian Mann
Chateaugay Correctional Facility, source of 110 jobs in northern Franklin County, is slated to close in July. File photo. Brian Mann

Budget deal closes two North Country prisons

A budget deal worked out over the weekend appears to lock in plans to mothball two North Country prisons, including facilities in Chateuagay in Franklin County and Mt. McGregor in Saratoga County.

According to a report in the Auburn Citizen newspaper, a total of four prisons statewide will be closed in July.

Prison guards and local officials from the North Country rallied earlier this month in Albany, demanding that Governor Cuomo keep at least some of the correctional facilities open.  Go to full article

« first  « previous 10  11-30 of 437  next 10 »  last »