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News stories tagged with "jobs"

Alcoa Offers Jobs, Investment for Power

Alcoa made its first concrete sign that it wants to stay in Massena for the next generation of aluminum production. According to the Watertown Daily Times, Alcoa offered the New York Power Authority a jobs-for-power deal at a meeting last week in New York City. Under the proposal, Alcoa would guarantee 500 to 700 high-wage union jobs in exchange for 30 to 50 years of cheap hydroelectric power. Alcoa currently employs almost 1300 workers at its two plants in Massena. The company would also invest up to $450 million to modernize what is the oldest continuously operating smelter in the world. David Sommerstein spoke with Ernie LaBaff about the proposed contract. He's president emeritus of the Aluminum, Brick, and Glassworkers Union and a former Alcoa worker. LaBaff says the offer is a good starting point.  Go to full article

Four Years On, Chatham Still in Court

A Vancouver-based lumber company is finalizing the purchase of a chipboard mill in St. Lawrence County. Ainsworth Lumber will buy the plant from Chatham Forest Products. But the factory has yet to be built. A dispute over an emissions permit has tied up the project in lawsuits since 2001. Supporters say the plant would boost an ailing forest industry. But environmentalists say it would pollute North Country air more than developers are letting on. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

BOCES Voc-Tech Training Popular, But Costs Draw Fire

On May 17, voters will decide whether to approve budgets for their local school districts. In many communities, one controversial cost is funding for BOCES. Board of Cooperative Educational Services chapters help public schools provide vocational training and support for children with disabilities. The program is especially popular in small, rural districts. But as Brian Mann reports, some district leaders complain that BOCES is charging too much for administration costs and salaries.  Go to full article

At 44, Still Seeking Her Dream Job

Women with Turner's Syndrome--the disease affects only women--have a damaged X chromosome. Symptoms include infertility, depression and health problems, such as brittle bones and heart ailments. Rebecca Shaney lives in Watertown. She wasn't diagnosed with Turner's until she was 28. When she was 29, she got her master's degree in French. Rebecca is, in her own words, obsessed with French. She's always wanted to be a French teacher. She has taught after school and tutored and been a sub, but she's never landed a full time teaching job. Meanwhile she's cleaned offices, washed dishes, and cashiered. She's currently on disability for a broken hip. She lives well under the poverty line. Rebecca had another job interview this month; we gave her a tape recorder the week before. She brings us this audio diary.  Go to full article

North Country Senators Want Empire Zone Tax Relief for Adirondack Park

State senator Betty Little wants to create a vast tax relief zone for the six million-acre Adirondack Park. Empire Development zones offers incentives to growing businesses, including income tax credits and relief on property taxes. The program would affect dozens of towns and villages. Senator Little spoke with Brian Mann.  Go to full article

Lawmaker Calls for Reform of the State Subsidy Program

Assemblyman Richard Brodsky says Governor Pataki's economic development agency has awarded taxpayer-funded grants to at least one company that specializes in outsourcing jobs from upstate New York to India. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article

Massive Tupper Lake Real Estate Proposal Draws Praise & Questions

The Adirondack Park Agency met in Tupper Lake last night to review plans for a massive new real estate project around the Big Tupper Ski Center. The project's developers are calling it "The Preserve On Tupper Lake". With more than eight hundred high end vacation homes and condos now on the drawing board, the proposal would reshape the entire community. It would bring jobs and a higher tax base to Tupper Lake. But as Chris Knight reports, some question the development's impact on the environment and on the village's infrastructure.  Go to full article
A full house at Lawrence Ave. Elementary, Potsdam
A full house at Lawrence Ave. Elementary, Potsdam

Walmart Friends, Foes Face Off in Potsdam

In Potsdam and the surrounding area, more than a thousand "Walmart Yes" lawn signs line the roads. Supporters of a 188,000 square foot proposed Supercenter outside the village have collected two thousand signatures. Opponents have written hundreds of letters against the project. The two camps made their cases last night before the Potsdam town planning board. More than 300 people packed a public hearing over Walmart's draft environmental impact statement. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Walmart Friends & Foes Face Off in Potsdam

Walmart supporters and critics clashed over job creation, sweatshop labor, and downtown shopping in a town forum in Potsdam last night. At issue is whether Potsdam should welcome a 180,000 square foot Walmart Supercenter to the outskirts of town. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Clinton Hails E-Commerce Project in Potsdam

Senator Hillary Clinton returned to the North Country this weekend. It was a rescheduled visit after plans last month were canceled when former President Bill Clinton had to undergo bypass surgery. Senator Clinton energized party faithful at the annual dinner of the St. Lawrence County Democratic Party Saturday night. During the day she visited Clarkson University in Potsdam, where she announced the expansion of an e-commerce program that helps local businesses market their products online. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

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