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John Brown
John Brown

Preview: John Brown?s legacy and future social change

Historian Zoe Trodd gives a lecture Saturday afternoon in Lake Placid to mark the 150th anniversary of John Brown's legendary raid at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. That raid struck a blow against slavery. Trodd will talk about the North Country's most famous abolitionist at the John Brown State Historic Site at 2 pm. Her talk kicks off a series of commemorative events this fall that will include a symposium and a reenactment of the return of Brown's body to North Elba. Trodd describes herself as modern-day abolitionist who takes inspiration from John Brown for today's movement against slavery and human trafficking. Todd Moe asked her how Brown is still relevant 150 years after his death.  Go to full article
Still relevant?  John Brown sparks debate, controversy 150 years after his death
Still relevant? John Brown sparks debate, controversy 150 years after his death

Story 2.0: Remembering John Brown 150 years after his execution

This year, communities across the U.S. will commemorate abolitionist John Brown. Brown was hanged 150 years ago, after his famous raid on Harpers Ferry in Virginia. The remembrances begin tomorrow in Lake Placid with events at the John Brown Farm State Historic Site. Later in the year, organizers hope to re-enact the funeral procession that carried Brown's body across Lake Champlain from Vermont and then through Elizabethtown to Lake Placid. Brian Mann first reported on Brown's legacy in 2002.  Go to full article

Preview: The John Brown 2002 Celebration

John Brown's life and work as an anti-slavery crusader will be commemorated Sunday afternoon at the Old County Courthouse in Elizabethtown, and at the John Brown Farm State Historic Site in Lake Placid. We hear from the keynote speaker at Sunday's event - Dennis Brutus, South African poet and human rights activist.  Go to full article

Dreaming of Timbuctoo

We hear about Timbuctoo, a movement to settle free black New Yorkers in the Adirondacks--from the curator of a new exhibit opening this week at the Adirondack Museum. It was more than just a homesteading plan--the issue was voting rights.  Go to full article

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