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News stories tagged with "jupiter"

Comet Panstarrs was first observed from Hawaii in June 2011. Image: <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZlenAvqLCI">ScienceAtNASA</a>
Comet Panstarrs was first observed from Hawaii in June 2011. Image: ScienceAtNASA

Dust off the binoculars: Comet Panstarrs cometh

The days are lengthening, but there's still plenty to see in the night sky. St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue joins Todd Moe to talk about the Snow Moon, the meteor that landed in Russia and Comet Panstarrs on the horizon.  Go to full article

Physics in the news, Jupiter in the sky

St. Lawrence University physics professor Aileen O'Donoghue was in the NCPR studio this morning, just after two Americans and one Australian-American, Saul Perlmutter, Adam Riess and Brian Schmidt, were announced as this year's Nobel Prize winners in physics. Their analysis of exploding stars showed that the universe is expanding at an accelerated rate.

She and Martha Foley talked about their work and its implications, and about other recent news that neutrinos have been measured at speeds faster than the speed of light. O'Donoghue also gave tips on what to see in the night sky, and how: Jupiter and its moons, with good binoculars.  Go to full article

Looking up at the winter sky

The sun is low, and the nights are long. St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue joins Martha Foley in the studio for a view of the winter sky.  Go to full article
Jeff Miller
Jeff Miller

Looking up at the night sky

Martha Foley talks with St. Lawrence University astronomer Jeff Miller about spotting the space station and other bright lights in the night sky.  Go to full article

Starlight, Star Bright: Venus, Mars and Jupiter in the Late Winter Night Sky

Martha Foley talks with St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue.  Go to full article

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