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News stories tagged with "kent"

The Rockwell Kent collections at SLU consist of over 100 pieces of correspondence, prints, books, drawings and ephemera.  (Photo: Special Collections)
The Rockwell Kent collections at SLU consist of over 100 pieces of correspondence, prints, books, drawings and ephemera. (Photo: Special Collections)

Rockwell Kent as gifted printmaker, book artist, author

Part of an exhibition of Rockwell Kent's work at St. Lawrence University explores his literary side. Kent was one of America's most famous 20th century artists, and owned a dairy farm in the eastern Adirondacks. Two exhibits of his work are on display through December 15 in St. Lawrence's Brush Art Gallery and the Owen D. Young Library's Special Collections.

Rockwell Kent: The Once Most Popular American Artist is a display of dozens of works in a variety of media. Kent's prominence as an artist, author, adventurer and socio-political activist made him a media phenomenon. He died in 1971.

In this second of a two-part series of conversations, Todd Moe toured the exhibit in Special Collections in the ODY Library. He spoke with Cathy Tedford, Brush Art Gallery Director and Special Collections Curator and Archivist Mark McMurray about the university's collection of Kent correspondence, original prints, books and other ephemera -- including some recent acquisitions.  Go to full article
<em>Peace Oath</em>, ca. 1967, wood engraving, private collection
Peace Oath, ca. 1967, wood engraving, private collection

Rockwell Kent's enduring art, legacy

An exhibition of one of America's most famous 20th century artists, and an Adirondack farmer, is on display through mid-December at St. Lawrence University. Rockwell Kent: The Once Most Popular American Artist is a display of more than 75 works in a variety of media, including some recent acquisitions by the university, in the Brush Art Gallery and at the Owen D. Young Library Special Collections.  Go to full article
Garden pots in winter storage.
Garden pots in winter storage.

No time to hibernate on the farm

Many of us are pining for fresh, locally grown salad greens this time of year. So, what's happening in mid-winter on the farms that sustain us during the growing season? Megan Kent runs a CSA farm in Heuvelton with her husband, Dan. She told Todd Moe that it's planning season for many vegetable growers. And the mid-winter months offer a time to shake off hibernation with lots of indoor projects.  Go to full article
Dan and Megan Kent's high tunnel on their farm near Heuvelton
Dan and Megan Kent's high tunnel on their farm near Heuvelton

Keeping the chill out of the garden

North Country gardeners are always searching for ways to extend the growing season. Todd Moe talks with a St. Lawrence County crop farmer who uses a "high tunnel," like an unheated greenhouse, to control temperature, rain and pests in his gardens.  Go to full article

Lake Placid Sled Federation Taken Over by USOC

The board of the Lake Placid-based U.S. Bobsled and Skeleton Federation voted Tuesday to accept a temporary takeover by the U.S. Olympic Committee. The move follows a turbulent winter. The federation was hit hard by sexual harassment allegations against former skeleton coach Tim Nardiello, who lives in Lake Placid, and the drug-related suspension of men's skeleton racer Zach Lund for a banned substance in a hair-restoration product he was using. USOC spokesman Darryl Seibel told the Associated Press that this was "a significant step" adding, "We want to see a governance and managerial structure that better serves the sport." This marks only the second time the USOC has been pushed to the drastic step of essentially taking over a sport's governing body. The other time was with the U.S. Taekwondo Union in 2004. Brian Mann spoke yesterday with the federation's interim executive director Terry Kent.  Go to full article

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