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News stories tagged with "keystone"

A Trans Canada worker inspects a pumping station in Steele City, Nebraska. Photos: Brian Mann
A Trans Canada worker inspects a pumping station in Steele City, Nebraska. Photos: Brian Mann

New York and the US look to Canada for energy, raising big questions about the environment

North Country congressman Bill Owens is praising a Canadian company for its plan to move forward with construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. Owens' backing for the controversial pipeline comes at a time when New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is also pushing a plan to import more hydro-electric power from Quebec.

Canada is already the biggest foreign supplier of energy to the US. And across the political spectrum, American leaders see Canada as a safer alternative to energy suppliers in the Middle East and Central America.

But there are growing questions about the environmental costs to Canada's energy boom and the debate is causing some Canadians to rethink their country's image as one of the world's most environmentally friendly societies. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Elizabeth May heads Canada's Green Party. Source: GP of Canada
Elizabeth May heads Canada's Green Party. Source: GP of Canada

Top environment leader questions Canada's green reputation

For decades, Canada has enjoyed a reputation as one of the greenest, most environmentally progressive societies in the world. But that image has been rattled recently by debates over Canadian oil development and plans to build the massive Keystone XL oil pipeline to the US. Last year, Canada withdrew from the Kyoto climate treaty, sparking anger from environmental groups.

Brian Mann sat down last week to talk with Elizabeth May, former head of Canada's Sierra Club and now the leader of her country's Green Party. May says Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper has led Canada down a dangerous path when it comes to the energy and environment. But she also says Canada's image as a green leader has been unraveling for decades.  Go to full article
Author and activist Bill McKibben. Source: 350.org
Author and activist Bill McKibben. Source: 350.org

McKibben sees losses, victories in climate change fight

It's been a big year for author and climate change activist Bill McKibben. His organization, 350.org, led a series of national protests against an oil pipeline from Canada known as Keystone XL.

Critics say the pipeline would accelerate carbon pollution. Last month, President Barack Obama rejected the project, sparking a fierce debate in Congress.

McKibben divides his time between North Creek in the Adirondacks and Ripton, Vermont. He sat down this week to talk in-depth with Brian Mann about the debate over global warming.

McKibben says this year's flooding and the unseasonably warm winter are symptoms of big changes that are already underway.  Go to full article

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