Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "knitting"

Martha Sinkeldam and Alison Charles crocheting and knitting in a sunny spot in Waddington's library. Photo: Todd Moe
Martha Sinkeldam and Alison Charles crocheting and knitting in a sunny spot in Waddington's library. Photo: Todd Moe

In a cozy corner in Waddington on a cold day

So, how do you cope with cold weather? A brisk walk outdoors, or indoors with a good book? Earlier this week, Todd Moe stopped by the library in Waddington, along the St. Lawrence River, but not to find a book.

Nearly every Tuesday afternoon, regardless of the weather, a few fiber artists gather at the library. It's informal. You'll find them in the Reading Room, surrounded by books, local heirlooms and their knitting, crocheting and embroidery projects.

It seemed like a cozy idea -- working with warm wool while the outdoor thermometer hovered below zero. But, the four women Todd met said they really don't mind winter -- a sunny window, in a cozy corner on a cold afternoon is just right.  Go to full article
Lis Barsuglia-Madsen and her husband Michael, love spending the winter months in their rustic home, filled with looms, near Harrisville.  Originally from Denmark, Lis uses bright colors to help offset overcast skies and the snowy landscape. Photo: Todd Moe
Lis Barsuglia-Madsen and her husband Michael, love spending the winter months in their rustic home, filled with looms, near Harrisville. Originally from Denmark, Lis uses bright colors to help offset overcast skies and the snowy landscape. Photo: Todd Moe

Living with looms and working with wool

March is the start of another busy season of exhibits, fairs and road trips for artisans across the region. Over the next few months, we'll bring you some of the voices of the many folks in the North Country who make a living in their own workshops, basements and spare rooms. It might sound charming - setting your own work hours - but the artisans we've talked to say full-time art is not an easy decision and a lot of hard work. Finding space, commissions, marketing, moral support, and reserving uninterrupted creative time are some of the challenges.

Today, a trip to the woods near Harrisville, in the northwestern Adirondacks, to visit a couple who gave up jobs in marketing and at the post office to devote their attention to all things fiber, from woven rugs to knitted sweaters. Lis Barsuglia-Madsen and her husband Michael moved from New Jersey to the North Country twenty years ago. The new environment offered a chance to focus on following a dream -- spending time together as artisans inspired by the mountains, deep woods and solitude.  Go to full article
The Tuesday Morning Knitting Group in Canton.  Photo: Todd Moe
The Tuesday Morning Knitting Group in Canton. Photo: Todd Moe

Swapping stories, stitches on a winter day

It's a natural fit on a cold winter day - working with wool yarn to knit a hat, socks or a sweater. But it probably comes as no surprise that for avid knitters, it's a year-round passion. Todd Moe stopped by Traditional Arts in Upstate New York in Canton last winter to visit a weekly knitting group. There are dozens of similar clubs around the region that meet at craft shops, bookstores, churches and living rooms.

Socially-minded knitters donate their creations to charitable projects, experienced knitters work on larger projects or enter contests and then there are those who just knit.

This month, the knitters are meeting at the Brewer Bookstore, as TAUNY prepares its new exhibit. So, on Tuesday mornings you'll find just a couple of knitters or a group as large as twenty sitting in a circle surrounded by skeins of yarn, half-finished sweaters and a spirit of generosity.  Go to full article
The Tuesday Morning Knitting Group at TAUNY in Canton.
The Tuesday Morning Knitting Group at TAUNY in Canton.

Knitting's hipness: sharing yarn, swapping stories

It may seem like a natural fit on a cold winter day - working with wool yarn to knit a hat, socks or a sweater. But it probably comes as no surprise that for avid knitters, it's a year-round passion. Todd Moe stopped by Traditional Arts in Upstate New York in Canton last week to visit a weekly knitting group. There are dozens of similar clubs around the region that meet at craft shops, bookstores, churches and living rooms.

Socially-minded knitters donate their creations to charitable projects, experienced knitters work on larger projects or enter contests and then there are those who just knit.

At TAUNY on Tuesday mornings you'll find just a couple of knitters or a group as large as 20. Last week, there were eight women sitting in a circle surrounded by skeins of yarn, half-finished sweaters and a spirit of generosity.  Go to full article

TAUNY looking for top hats

Make a hat - win a prize. Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, TAUNY, is sponsoring a handmade hat contest this season. Todd Moe talks with TAUNY Director Jill Breit about some of the guidelines.  Go to full article
Annis knits up to six hours a day in her Chestertown yarn shop (above), and models a pair of Adirondack Buff mittens (below)
Annis knits up to six hours a day in her Chestertown yarn shop (above), and models a pair of Adirondack Buff mittens (below)

Knitting a life in Chestertown

TAUNY, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, hands out its annual North Country Legends awards in Canton this Sunday. One of the recipients, 88 year-old Annis Holmes, opened her yarn shop in Chestertown in 1952. She still runs the shop and teaches people to knit. She's known as an expert Adirondack Buff mitten knitter, developed in response to the region's cold winters. Todd Moe stopped by her knitting shop recently for a chat.  Go to full article

For Women Who Knit Too Much

The yarn harlot comes to Canton tonight. Stephanie Pearl-McPhee is author of a book called "At Knit's End" Meditation for Women Who Knit Too Much", author also of a funny web blog for people like her who are obsessed with knitting. Pearl-McPhee is a mother in her mid-thirties, a Canadian. She's found echoes of her OWN fixation in the hearts of knitters across both Canada and the US. She'll be at the St. Lawrence University Bookstore in Canton this evening from 6 to 8. Martha Foley spoke with her in May. She was at home in Toronto.  Go to full article

For Women Who Knit Too Much

Stephanie Pearl-McPhee is the author of a book called At Knit's End, Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much. She also writes a funny web blog for people like her who are obsessed with knitting. Pearl-McPhee is a mother in her mid-thirties, a Canadian, who has found echoes of her OWN fixation in the hearts of knitters across both Canada and the US. She'll be at Kaleidescope Yarns in Essex Junction, VT tomorrow from 3 to 6. She took time out from her book tour to talk with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
5th graders at Canton Middle School are lining up to learn how to knit.
5th graders at Canton Middle School are lining up to learn how to knit.

Hooked on Knitting: It's High Touch Not High Tech

The art of knitting has been practiced for thousands of years. It's a skill usually handed down from parent to child. Most of us remember the perennial hand-knit holiday sweater or hat. In the last few years knitting has soared in popularity. People of all ages are taking to the ancient craft. There are knitting guilds in coffee shops, living rooms and yarn stores. Fifth graders in Canton gather weekly for a knitting club in the school library. As Todd Moe reports, it's become one of the most popular after school activities for girls and boys.  Go to full article
Barb Klemens
Barb Klemens

Meet the Masters: Barbara Klemens and The Yarn Shop

For more than 50 years, Canton has been home to Barb Klemens and the Yarn Shop on Church Street. If you want to work with interesting yarns and need anything from needles to row markers or help with a button hole Barb's shop is the place to go. Lamar Bliss knows this from experience. 30 years ago she stopped in the shop for yarn in what was the first of many visits.  Go to full article

1-10 of 12  next 2 »  last »